limb

(redirected from limbless)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical.

limb

1
1. an arm or leg, or the analogous part on an animal, such as a wing
2. any of the main branches of a tree

limb

2
1. the edge of the apparent disc of the sun, a moon, or a planet
2. Botany
a. the expanded upper part of a bell-shaped corolla
b. the expanded part of a leaf, petal, or sepal
3. either of the two halves of a bow
4. either of the sides of a geological fold
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

limb

(lim) The apparent edge of the Sun, Moon, or a planet, or any other celestial body with a detectable disk.
Collins Dictionary of Astronomy © Market House Books Ltd, 2006
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Limb

 

a flat metal ring divided by lines into equal parts of circumference (for example, degrees or minutes). It is the most important part of instruments used in measuring angles (in astronomy, geodesy, physics, and so on); it gives a reading of the magnitude of the angle. The scale units of a limb are read by means of a vernier or a micrometric microscope.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

limb

[limb]
(anatomy)
An extremity or appendage used for locomotion or prehension, such as an arm or a leg.
(astronomy)
The circular outer edge of a celestial body; the half with the greater altitude is called the upper limb, and the half with the lesser altitude, the lower limb.
(botany)
A large primary tree branch.
(design engineering)
The graduated margin of an arc or circle in an instrument for measuring angles, as that part of a marine sextant carrying the altitude scale.
The graduated staff of a leveling rod.
(geology)
One of the two sections of an anticline or syncline on either side of the axis. Also known as flank.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
"Currently robots that use limbless locomotion do not come close to their natural counterparts in terms of capabilities.
UK charities, The Limbless Association, Limbcare and LimbPower are marking the day by taking part in an event in Chelmsford, Essex, organised by Chelmsford City Council and Anglia Ruskin University, which takes place on 1 December 2012 on the University campus.
The event was held in February to benefit BLESMA - the British Limbless Ex-Servicemen's Association - and took place at Keele Hall, Staffordshire.
John Davis, who fought in the rearguard, described seeing "headless and limbless torsos with stomachs ripped out".
John Davis, who fought in the rearguard, described seeing "headless and limbless torsos with stomachs ripped out" and said that the "sweet smell of death" was overwhelming.
A field of bodies is lamentable; one man left blind, limbless, faceless and praying for death is a personal tragedy.
"Squamates" is the name for lizards--including snakes and limbless lizards.
After reading the article, the London-based Limbless Association has invited Mr Curtis and any Teesside bikers to an event next month which aims to help people who have lost limbs keep biking.
Biomechanics specialists have long known that snails and other limbless creatures locomote by sending waves of muscular contractions down their bodies.
9 WWW.HOMESTARRUNNER.COM Ever since I dumped my cable so I could afford DSL I've been keeping myself entertained here, following the cartoon lives of stuffy-nosed Homestar Runner, his limbless girlfriend, Marzipan, and his archenemy Strong Bad.