lime putty

lime putty

[′līm ¦pəd·ē]
(materials)
A puttylike cement made from lime slaked in water.

lime putty, plasterer’s putty

A hydrated lime which has been slaked with sufficient water to form a thick paste; used in plastering.
References in periodicals archive ?
If these analyses determine that a lime mortar was used originally, the building should be repointed using a lime mortar, preferably made with lime putty.
Traditional skills are being utilised in the restoration including oak lath and three-coat fibrous lime putty plaster to ceilings, two-coat fibrous lime putty plaster to walls, fibrous plaster mouldings and cornices, traditionally made cast-iron windows, purpose made cast iron gutters, lead-lined valley gutters and replacement king posts and dragon ties to the roof structures.
Denbighshire County Council's archaeologist, Fiona Gale, said: "Mortar mixes, using lime putty and very gritty sand, aim to match as closely as possible mortars used by the original Welsh masons in the 13th century."
The longer the soak, the more mellow and plastic the lime putty becomes.
Lime putty: Annie also sells lime putty - 1 litre is pounds 2.95, 5 litres is pounds 9.95.
Contractors tried to keep with tradition while restoring the building, and even used lime putty to plaster the walls.
About 180 tonnes of sub-soil from a Shropshire quarry will be used for the walls which will then be made weather-proof with lime putty and sand render.
Traditional techniques such as lime putty pointing are being used.
The logic for the soft lime putty mortar used throughout the building is to do with limiting long term movement.
The primary component of lime plasters is lime putty, a hydrated-lime product (calcium hydroxide,) with the consistency of sour cream.