Bardo

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Related to liminal state: Liminality

Bardo

blind antiquarian wrapped up in his scholarly annotations of the classics. [Br. Lit.: George Eliot Romola]
References in periodicals archive ?
The productive nature of the liminal state is further explored in the chapter evocatively entitled "Between Pharaoh's Army and the Red Sea.
Indeed, identifying a threshold concept is problematic due to the very ambiguity of the liminal state.
The airplane, the letters, the tied box and the shoes refer to the journey; the open scissors representing the break from homeland and the beginning of the liminal state.
In his Ritual Process: Structure and Anti-Structure (1969), Victor Turner describes the liminal state as formative and transitional:
A person in a liminal state is in a process of becoming but is not yet; for s/he is not in a present fixed point and nor is s/he in a future fixed point.
With their lives at stake, caught in a liminal state, writers counter the oubliette of the blank page with the black ink of witness and imagination--the power of the liberated pen.
We attempt to visualize this seemingly violent scene of destruction as all blend into one self-reflecting watery state--"The river in itself is drowned" (471)--a liminal state spawning imaginative creations of every kind--eels bellowing within oxen (473-4), horses hanging on to leeches (475-6), boats sailing over bridges (477), and fish intruding on horses' stables.
5) In this liminal state, it was also thought she should not breastfeed, though this latter prohibition was not always observed.
She argues that while David is transformed from a simple shepherd to a glorious monarch and while Gilgamesh progresses from glory-seeking superman to wise and responsible ruler, each inhabits a liminal state, marked by the flouting of conventional sexual roles.
John McGavin's study of theatricality and narrative in early Scotland seeks to cast some light on the liminal state that such records occupy.
In nursing, Forss, Tishelman, Widmark, and Sachs (2004) use liminality to describe women receiving abnormal Pap smear results that "can be seen as an unintentional transition from routine confirmation of health to ambivalence, or a liminal state, as the women expected to have health confirmed but instead neither health nor disease was confirmed or excluded" (p.