limited-distance modem

limited-distance modem

[′lim·əd·əd ¦dis·təns ′mō‚dem]
(communications)
A modem used only for communications within a building in order to improve the signal quality where a long distance exists between the terminal and the computer.
(computer science)
A device designed to transmit and receive signals over relatively short distances, typically less than 5 miles (8 kilometers). Abbreviated LDM. Also known as line driver.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

line driver

A device that extends the transmission distance between terminals and computers connected via private lines or networks. Also called a "short-haul modem" or "limited-distance modem," line drivers can extend a signal that is normally limited to a few dozen or a few hundred feet up to several miles. Line drivers are used to connect point-of-sale (POS) terminals, sensors, machine tools and myriad other digital devices to a host computer.
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References in periodicals archive ?
This is more than 10 times as fast as the fastest voice-band modem and over twice as far as any high-speed limited-distance modem.
Expect to find 2B1Q in applications such as very-high-performance limited-distance modems, T1-multiplexer tail circuits, PBXs, ISDN terminal adapters, and new telephone-company service offerings such as data/voice multiplexing and CO LANs.
The 5811 limited-distance modem can transmit data over distances to 15 miles at synchronous rates of 2.4, 4.8, 9.6 and 19.2 kb/s.
"We decided to change to ISDN because it offers more flexibility and speed than the limited-distance modems," says Rick Fox, information management analyst.

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