naval mine

(redirected from Limpet Mine)
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Related to Limpet Mine: Landmine, Naval mines

naval mine

[′nā·vəl ‚mīn]
(ordnance)
An item designed to be located under water and exploded by means of propeller vibration, magnetic attraction, contact, or remote control.
References in periodicals archive ?
Worryingly, the Gulf of Oman attack came only shortly after Iranian forces were implicated in using limpet mines in the attack on four tankers last month, offshore the Emirati port of Fujairah, a major bunker port for European-Asian marine traffic.
It's very puzzling, and even the aerial video 'evidence' of a small Iranian boat allegedly removing an unexploded limpet mine from one of the tankers makes little sense.
The US military had previously released images it said showed the IRGC removing an unexploded limpet mine from the Kokuka Courageous, which was hit by explosions along with the Norwegian-owned Front Altair ship on June 13.
Later that day, the US military released a blurry video showing what they claimed were Iranian sailors removing an "unexploded limpet mine" from the 'Kokuka Courageous.' The poor quality of the video made it especially challenging to independently verify the claims.
Another photo taken by the helicopter showed Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps sailors removing an unexploded limpet mine from the ship, according to the information.
The black-and-white footage, as well as still photographs released by the US military's Central Command on Friday, appeared to show the limpet mine on the Kokuka Courageous.
While Tehran has denied being involved in the attacks, US Central Command released footage it said shows Iran's Revolutionary Guard removing an unexploded limpet mine from the Japanese-owned tanker, Kokuka Courageous.
Shanahan said that is why the American military released a video which, it claimed, showed a patrol boat of the Islamic Revolutionary Guards, a powerful branch of the Iranian military, pulling alongside one of the tankers to remove an unexploded limpet mine from its hull.
Those tensions rose markedly after the 12 May limpet mine attacks in the UAE.
Navy crew on the USS Bainbridge (DDG-96), an Arleigh Burke-class guided missile destroyer, reported seeing an unexploded limpet mine on the side of one of the ships.
US Central Command spokesman Bill Urban released a video of what the US military said was an IRGC Gashti Class patrol boat approaching the ship Kokuka Courageous "and was observed and recorded removing (an) unexploded limpet mine from the M/T Kokuka Courageous." The attacks on the ships are part of a "campaign" of "escalating tension" by Iran and a threat to international peace and security, US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said.