line noise

line noise

[′līn ‚nȯiz]
(communications)
Noise originating in a transmission line from such causes as poor joints and inductive interference from power lines.

line noise

(communications)
1. Spurious characters due to electrical noise in a communications link, especially an EIA-232 serial connection. Line noise may be induced by poor connections, interference or crosstalk from other circuits, electrical storms, cosmic rays, or (notionally) birds crapping on the phone wires.

2. Any chunk of data in a file or elsewhere that looks like the results of electrical line noise.

3. Text that is theoretically a readable text or program source but employs syntax so bizarre that it looks like line noise. Yes, there are languages this ugly. The canonical example is TECO, whose input syntax is often said to be indistinguishable from line noise. Other non-WYSIWYG editors, such as Multics "qed" and Unix "ed", in the hands of a real hacker, also qualify easily, as do deliberately obfuscated languages such as INTERCAL.
References in periodicals archive ?
The equipment supports the load of critical data center components during power failure and regularly filters out line noise.
Electronic components within the wall plate filter the inbound signal, separating the VDSL signal which provides voice, data and video service, from the POTS signal and line noise.
Other than its smoother spectrum, the Quiet Fan package shows no improvement over the existing chiller, with an estimated property line noise level of 65 dBA.
Impedance discontinuities associated with trace routing reflect a portion of the signal being transmitted and contribute unwanted transmission line noise and ISI.
Our service technicians now must be concerned not only with tip and ring, load points and line noise, but also modems, optical data transmission and upload/download speeds.
Discover the new math of low line noise through the concepts of true power, apparent power and power factor.
Phase control dimmers create power line noise and they waste a small amount of power.
This system is a cost-effective solution for users in industries faced with wiring costs and line noise problems.
The city's noise ordinance and JEPB Rule 4 further establish decibel limits for property line noise sources, vehicles, and various other sources to limit the impact noise may have on the community.
Additional features include a side-mounted automatic fan control that allows the fan to run only when necessary to conserve energy and reduce ingested dust and dirt; a built-in power line conditioner that protects against damage from power line noise and spikes, even with poor quality power; a torch wrap and spare parts kit holder allowing convenient storage of the torch and spare parts in the consumable box; and a plug'n'play mechanized option that transforms the manual cutting system into a powerful mechanized system for a gantry machine.
A side-mounted automatic fan control allows the fan to run only when necessary to conserve energy and reduce ingested dust and dirt, and a built-in power line conditioner protects against damage from power line noise and spikes, even with poor quality power.
For limiting the bandwidth and rejecting the power line noise a combination of a bandpass filter and a notch filter centered on a 50 Hz was used.