line of flight


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line of flight

[′līn əv ¦flīt]
(mechanics)
The line of movement, or the intended line of movement, of an aircraft, guided missile, or projectile in the air.

line of flight

The line in the air that an aerial vehicle like an aircraft flies or travels.
References in periodicals archive ?
In Foucault's system of thought, passion functions as a line of flight operates in Deleuze: it is an opening, a movement, and an acceleration that creates new possibilities of existence.
Swing the gun fast along its line of flight, and when the bird disappears behind the muzzle, shoot.
Latin America is rhizomatic, with its Indians without genealogy, its ever fleeing limit, its creeping frontiers, the search for a recoding with Europe, the overcoding of the Spanish influence/colonization, the capitalist decoding of that historical movement, but the role of the "magical" the "fantastic" as a line of flight that links dream, madness, the Indian mental and perceptual instability, the shifting borders, the "rhizome".
Under the newer, more accurate, civilian signal, a GPS can help you mark the blood trail, giving you a line of flight.
Rather, he seeks to establish a line of flight through an emotional purging, characteristic of the Christian search for grace in which the individual approaches God with a broken heart and a contrite spirit, a blank subjectivity which one may call humility.
But the piece de resistance of the fourth hole of The Venice Golf and Country Club stands along the horizon: a huge pine, directly in the line of flight, painfully, implacably situated 219 yards away, on the very edge of success.
Only after I made the non-refundable purchase did I find out that the iPad cannot be mounted at an angle to the airplane's line of flight to use its internal GPS for Al-IRS (an important part of the emergency landing function of Xavion), and it will not perform its takeoff recording function unless it is running as the primary app on takeoff.
While these contributions deal with the fundamental questions of ethics in Deleuze's work, each chapter in the book takes up a specific line of flight: the spirit of capitalism, feminist ethics and its ambivalent relation to Deleuze, his reflections on death, his discussions of Artaud and theories of extremity generally, the solipsism of thought, the particular and universal, and so on, each thus recalibrating and reformulating the very question of what it means to think and live ethically, which in the end is a question of how one might live otherwise.
Another tangential line of flight linked to the reminiscences inspired by Sandra's journal was my reading of Tompkins' (1996) memoirs of her experiences from grade-school student to university professor.
"Egofugality" is nothing less than an evolutionary proposal, according to Hasegawa--the individual's liberation from itself on a line of flight toward a collective intellect.