line vortex

line vortex

[′līn ′vȯr‚teks]
(fluid mechanics)
A type of fluid motion in which fluid flows approximately in circles about a line, at speeds inversely proportional to the distance from the line, so that there is an infinite concentration of vorticity on the line, and vorticity vanishes elsewhere.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The induced velocity of a spatial point below the rotor disc plane can be calculated by the sum of the induced velocities excited by center line vortex, rotor disk vortex, and skew cylinder vortex based on the generalized vortex theory.
Based on the generalized vortex theory, the skew screw vortex cylinder can be divided into three parts: center line vortex, rotor disk vortex, and skew cylinder vortex as shown in Figure 1.
The direction of center line vortex is from down to up along the axis of skew screw vortex cylinder.
According to formula (2), the axial component of induced velocity by center line vortex can be written as