line-of-sight velocity

line-of-sight velocity

See radial velocity.

line-of-sight velocity

[′līn əv ′sīt və′läs·əd·ē]
(mechanics)
References in periodicals archive ?
(8) To resolve the line-of-sight velocity component, the size of the point spread function (PSF) appearing as a result of optical diffraction is correlated to the distance of a particle to the focus plane.
The line-of-sight velocity of the cloud is ~28-30 km/s.
As the line-of-sight velocity difference between the components is only ~600 km/s, the merger must be occurring nearly in the plane of the sky and the cores passed through each other ~100 Myr ago." Various online sources (including en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bullet_cluster) describe the cluster as being" ...
Several teams detected it in the late 1990s by measuring small variations in the star's line-of-sight velocity caused by the planet's gravitational tug (S&T: June 2001, page 34).
Most scientists assumed that the unmeasured components would be comparable to the line-of-sight velocity. In the unlikely event that the stars move much more slowly across the sky than they do along the line of sight to Earth, the unseen heavyweight need not be as massive or compact as a black hole.
By measuring the radar echoes' time delay (range) and Doppler frequency (line-of-sight velocity), Ostro and his colleagues can resolve the size, shape, spin, structure, and surface properties of an asteroid.
A Canadian astronomer suggested that sectoral oscillations of an l = 2, m = 2 mode, and not a Jupiter-mass planet, are responsible for the line-of-sight velocity variations in the Sun-like star 51 Pegasi (May issue, page 24).