line-to-ground fault

line-to-ground fault

[′līn tə ′grau̇nd ‚fȯlt]
(electricity)
A defect in a power or communications line in which faulty insulation allows the conductor to make contact with the earth.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
He recalled that "intentionally and maliciously planted banana trees" within the power line corridor caused a line-to-ground fault that tripped high voltage lines and led to a blackout across the entire Zamboanga peninsula, including areas served by distribution utilities Zamsureco I, Zamsureco II, Zaneco, Zamcelco, Moelci I, Moelci II, and parts of Laneco.
The simulation conditions of a symmetrical fault are defined as follows: a three-phase line-to-ground fault is supposed to happen on the main network at t = 2 s; the fault resistance is [R.sub.g] = 1[ohm] [32, 33]; the fault duration is 170 ms.
To investigate the active SFCL's impacts on the wind generation system under the asymmetrical fault, a double-phase (A phase and B phase) line-to-ground fault is supposed to happen on the main network at t = 2 s.
This can elevate the line-to-ground voltages of the 2 unfaulted phases which in turn charge the line-to-ground fault capacitance (insulation).
The power failure that struck the entire Zamboanga peninsula over two weeks ago was caused by 'intentionally and maliciously planted banana trees,' which caused a line-to-ground fault that tripped high voltage lines, the National Grid Corporation of the Philippines said on Monday.
These banana trees, apart from violating right-of-way clearances, reached a height that caused the line-to-ground fault and subsequent tripping.
Let's consider a single circuit transmission line with one ground wire connected to the ground at every tower of the line, each transmission tower having its own grounding electrode or grid and let's assume that a single line-to-ground fault appears at one tower of this transmission line.
3 presents the connection of the ground wire connected to earth through transmission towers and the ground fault current distribution when a single line-to-ground fault appears at the last tower.
In total, there are 72 training patterns, which characterize a line-to-ground fault, in this case of phase A, in three different places of the line, at the sending end (3 Km), in the middle (6.5 Km), and last at the receiving end of the line (3 Km).
3.1 Result comparison for single line-to-ground fault
14 and fig 15, it is observed that a line-to-ground fault occurs on the rectifier and Inverter sides of HVDC System.
These fault types can be divided into ten classes, including single phase-to-ground faults (AG, BG, and CG), line-to-line faults (AB, AC, and BC), double line-to-ground faults (ABG, ACG, and BCG), and three-phase short-circuit faults (ABC).