linear argument

linear argument

(theory)
A function argument which is used exactly once by the function.

If the argument is used at most once then it is safe to inline the function and replace the single occurrence of the formal parameter with the actual argument expression. If the argument was used more than once this transformation would duplicate the argument expression, causing it to be evaluated more than once.

If the argument is sure to be used at least once then it is safe to evaluate it in advance (see strictness analysis) whereas if the argument was not used then this would waste work and might prevent the program from terminating.
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Although this allows Singer to build a linear argument, it also establishes a volatile foundation for it, in that if this axiom is not accepted the reader 'need read no further'.
Readers looking for a tidy narrative with a linear argument will not find it here; but students and scholars who want to understand not just "what happened" in the past but "what it was like" to live there will find ample resources in this book.
He has indeed succeeded in not reducing all of that ferment to a linear argument or homogenizing construct.
Becker considers this potential weakness as a virtue, suggesting that the various chapters of the book be read in any order one wishes, intending the book as a "whole to look more like a network of thoughts and examples than a linear argument" (p.
This approach does not generate anything like a linear argument. Yet it does make for many interesting suggestions.
It does not claim to develop a linear argument or to offer a complete repertory of contemporary constrained writing, but rather to contribute some new elements to a general theory of constraint (12).
It is also possible to provide non-linear, interactive, access to materials that used to be restricted to linear argument by the nature of print publication.
Lukacs circles around topics, sounding various themes and ideas, rather than putting forward anything resembling a linear argument. These are often compelling ruminations, all the more interesting for their refusal to acknowledge the political pieties of our time.
No sooner has he gotten Isherwood to Vedanta than he is wondering: "How did other contemporary Europeans and Americans search for a guru?" The plot is lost, here and repeatedly, as if linear argument were too obvious.
Indeed, the perspective or focus varies considerably from chapter to chapter, from literary analysis to psychological commentary to social history to theology, with the result that the book reads not as a linear argument or arguments, but rather as a series of slices of life and thought.
She resists, however, a linear argument which positions the early modern period as transitional between the religious perspective attributed to the Middle Ages and the clinical or 'scientific' perspective widely said to characterize discussions from the later seventeenth century through the nineteenth century.
Alan Riding of The New York Times called Ferguson "the greatest British historian of his generation:' Some academics, on the other hand, though wowed by his writing and synthetic ability (five complex years of world history combined into one linear argument!), charged him with intellectual overstretch--with underestimating, among other things, the role of the French.

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