linear argument

linear argument

(theory)
A function argument which is used exactly once by the function.

If the argument is used at most once then it is safe to inline the function and replace the single occurrence of the formal parameter with the actual argument expression. If the argument was used more than once this transformation would duplicate the argument expression, causing it to be evaluated more than once.

If the argument is sure to be used at least once then it is safe to evaluate it in advance (see strictness analysis) whereas if the argument was not used then this would waste work and might prevent the program from terminating.
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Readers looking for a tidy narrative with a linear argument will not find it here; but students and scholars who want to understand not just "what happened" in the past but "what it was like" to live there will find ample resources in this book.
He has indeed succeeded in not reducing all of that ferment to a linear argument or homogenizing construct.
It does not claim to develop a linear argument or to offer a complete repertory of contemporary constrained writing, but rather to contribute some new elements to a general theory of constraint (12).
It is also possible to provide non-linear, interactive, access to materials that used to be restricted to linear argument by the nature of print publication.
Lukacs circles around topics, sounding various themes and ideas, rather than putting forward anything resembling a linear argument.
The plot is lost, here and repeatedly, as if linear argument were too obvious.
Indeed, the perspective or focus varies considerably from chapter to chapter, from literary analysis to psychological commentary to social history to theology, with the result that the book reads not as a linear argument or arguments, but rather as a series of slices of life and thought.
She resists, however, a linear argument which positions the early modern period as transitional between the religious perspective attributed to the Middle Ages and the clinical or 'scientific' perspective widely said to characterize discussions from the later seventeenth century through the nineteenth century.
Thus, these writers' works are necessarily shot through with paradox, and often with pain, and Diethe avoids making any simplistic, linear argument, recognizing that the later writers she discusses were not necessarily more pro-feminist than their intellectual ancestors.
Allen indeed insists that commentators who maintain there is a linear argument implicit in the apparently opposed sets of hypotheses ignore the blatantly absurd surface.
He responds to the dangers of an overdetermining narrative by 'jumping and shifting' from one fictional or cultural text to another, breaking up a linear argument.
These three subjects - Coleridge, nationalism, and women - contain many subsets that confound the development of linear argument in ways that sometimes complicate the reading, not always usefully.

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