linear logic


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linear logic

(theory)
A logic invented by Girard in 1987 that can be used in proofs related to resource usage.

http://brics.dk/LS/96/6/BRICS-LS-96-6/BRICS-LS-96-6.html.

[Wadler, P., "Is there a use for linear logic", ACM/IFIP PEPM Conference, 1991].

References in periodicals archive ?
The goal of the project is to leverage recent work in computational logic (in particular linear logic and its extensions) to design type systems for process calculi (a mathematical representation of distributed software) that support the features necessary to the development of a programming language.
But I would specifically say poetry and not literature: poetry doesn't follow a linear logic like much literature and is in tune with visual art, which is not linear.
xvii)--both because, in Sanjines's view, it subverts modernity's linear logic, triumphalist teleologies, and empiricist truth claims, and because, through the essay form, Sanjines seeks to reclaim the alternative voices and experiences of those silenced or marginalized by western paradigms of modernity (both on the page and on the ground).
From concepts and proofs to fun examples, this covers the basics of numbers, their odd relationships, the evolution of Roman numerals and their use today, and modern linear logic and theory.
To Meadows, GD&T is "a language of linear logic," and his ultimate goal is to leave one capable of reading a drawing Like a native speaker.
It has become a useful tool in studying noncommutative topology, linear logic and C*-algebra theory [4-6].
This leads him to select as a plausible candidate LL, a fragment of linear logic that differs from R in that it rejects both contraction and distribution.
The papers, which include abstracts and references, cover type theory (including a dependent set theory), computational proof theory (including methods of problem solving in elementary geometry), security (including highly efficient proofs of correctness of computations that preserve secrecy), timed and stochastic systems, verification, constraints, proof complexity, finite model theory, concurrency and process calculi, semantics of programming languages (including the algebraic theory of effects), game semantics (including categorical combinatories for "innocent" strategies), linear logic, and topology and computable mathematics.
In the next four chapters, Poole focuses his discussion specifically on Paradise Lost, looking at the linear logic of unfallen thought compared to the circularity of fallen thought and the ways the epic is both linear and circular in its mode of justifying the ways of God to man.
The artist's appropriation of Descartes's famous dictum unravels its linear logic, recasting the rational subject as dreamy doodler.
Not that von Trier's unhappiness follows what might be called linear logic.
Service-learning courses offer the opportunity for students to make sense of the social world in ways that do not rely on the linear logic of textbooks.