lines of code


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lines of code

(programming, unit)
(LOC) A common measure of the size or progress of a programming project. For example, one can describe a completed project as consisting of 100,000 LOC; or one can characterise a week's progress as 5000 LOC.

Using LOC as a metric of progress encourages programmers to reinvent the wheel or split their code into lots of short lines.

lines of code

The instructions a programmer writes when creating a program. Lines of code are the "source code" of the program, and one line may generate one machine instruction or several depending on the programming language. A line of code in assembly language is typically turned into one machine instruction. In a high-level language such as C++ or Java, one line of code generates a series of assembly language instructions, which results in multiple machine instructions. For coding examples, see source code.

Lines of Code Are Not All the Same
A single line of code may call for the inclusion of a subroutine that can be of any size, so while lines of code are commonly used to measure the overall complexity of a program, the metric is not absolute. Comparisons can also be misleading if the programs are written in different languages. For example, 20 lines of code in Java might easily require 200 lines of code in assembly language.

In addition, measuring lines of code says absolutely nothing about code quality. Five hundred lines written by a seasoned programmer can perform the same processing as two thousand lines of code by another. See assembly language, machine language and compiler.
References in periodicals archive ?
It handles several millions lines of code just as easily as a few thousand--it just takes a little longer."
Lines of code depend upon coding practices and Function points vary according to the user or software requirement [14].
* Defect density (defects per 1,000 lines of code) of open source code and commercial code has continued to improve since 2013:
Each employee was responsible on average for approximately 32,000 lines of code, which is lower than industry numbers, but well within the norm for medical or aerospace.
The new release requires about five lines of code to access business logic using its DataWindow technology.
It applies the author's infamous live-code approach to JavaScript operations, presenting the basics in the form of over a hundred tested programs with 6,000 lines of code and detailed descriptions.
Software size is usually measured by counting the lines of code. Using lines of code as a measure has its roots in early programming.
CEO Adam Asnes said that Globalyzer can "sift through millions of lines of code to get software up and running for a global base."
Add a couple of lines of code to the part description and most of the work would be complete.
It's the programers I feel sorry for - all those hours spent poring over lines of code, knowing all along that what they were creating was total, utter pants.
According to Eric Branyan, avionics engineer at Lockheed, the F-35 is the most software-intensive combat airplane ever built, with 5.3 million lines of code. He said the company is on track to finish software development by 2011.