line of sight

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Related to lines of sight: Line of site

line of sight

[′līn əv ′sīt]
(electromagnetism)
The straight line for a transmitting radar antenna in the direction of the beam.
(science and technology)
A straight, unobstructed path or line between two points, as between an observer's eye and a target.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

line of sight, line of collimation

The line extending from an instrument along which distant objects are seen, when viewed with the telescope or other sighting device. Also see sight line.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

line of sight

An unobstructed path from a transmitting device to the receiver. Users are aware of line of sight when they aim their infrared (IR) remote control directly at the TV. Microwave transmissions between towers at the top of mountains and buildings require unobstructed line of sight. See IR remote control.

Any Radio Frequency
Technically, line of sight refers to radio frequency (RF) transmission in general, including Wi-Fi and cellular. Although walls and other obstructions may attenuate (lessen) or block signals entirely, the receiving device must be in the radiation pattern emitted by the transmitter, which is also considered line of sight. See RF.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Because the probability of finding so many matching absorption regions by chance is small, a number of astronomers concluded that the two lines of sight intercept a single supercluster of galaxies at least 15 million light-years across and 45 million light-years deep.
To get a sense of whether the observed periodicity represents a genuine pattern or merely a statistical fluke, researchers at the Lawrence Livermore (Calif.) National Laboratory and the University of California, San Diego, used simple computer models to study the kinds of patterns generated by various lines of sight through different distributions of matter.
The angular diameter, the angle between lines of sight from the earth to opposite ends of the star's diameter, can be converted to kilometers if astronomers know the distance to the star.