gyrus

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Related to lingual gyrus: angular gyrus, cuneus, uncus

gyrus

[′jī·rəs]
(anatomy)
One of the convolutions (ridges) on the surface of the cerebrum.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
We found that in addition to the medial temporal lobe system, ReHo value significantly decreased in the right occipital lobe and lingual gyrus suggesting the presence of resting-state brain functional abnormalities in multiple brain areas, which are associated with memory in aMCI patients.
(28) Luciana and colleagues reported similar findings, such that alcohol-naive controls showed an increase in volume in white-matter regions of the precentral gyrus, miTG, SFG, and lingual gyrus between baseline and follow-up, whereas binge drinking adolescents did not.
During this event, SCZ + S patients had increased activations in the right cerebellar declive and the lingual gyrus, relative to SCZ - S patients, as well as increased activations on the left superior temporal gyrus, relative to healthy controls.
The ReHo value of the depression group was higher in the right superior occipital gyrus and right middle occipital gyrus and lower in the left lingual gyrus, bilateral anterior cingulate gyrus, and paracingulate gyri.
These significantly different nodes were mainly concentrated in the bilateral lenticular nucleus: the putamen; bilateral lingual gyrus; bilateral amygdala; bilateral thalamus; bilateral median cingulate and paracingulate gyri; right posterior cingulate gyrus; bilateral cuneus; left anterior cingulate and paracingulate gyri; right superior frontal gyrus, orbital part; right middle frontal gyrus; right temporal pole; middle temporal gyrus; left precentral gyrus; right lenticular nucleus; pallidum; and so forth.
It involves a network of posterior and medial regions of the parietal cortex, the lingual gyrus, the hippocampus, the parahippocampal gyrus, the entorhinal cortex, the striate cortex and the cerebellum (Hafting, Fyhn, Molden, Moser, & Moser, 2005).
Functional MR showed improved blood flow in three brain regions involved with encoding and memorization of nonverbal associations: the right lingual gyrus, the occipital fusiform gyrus, and the right frontal pole.
Functional MRI showed improved blood flow in three brain regions involved with encoding and memorization of nonverbal associations: the right lingual gyrus, the occipital fusiform gyrus, and the right frontal pole.
The activated areas with positive BOLD signal include the superior prefrontal cortex, inferior prefrontal cortex, and others and with negative BOLD signal in the ACC and right lingual gyrus and others, as shown in Figure 2C.
After variance analyses (with Alphasim correction) on the whole brain's grey matter volume with two groups' imaging data, it was found that compared to the control group, the grey matter volume of the patient group increased in the left superior frontal gyrus (t=4.41), and decreased in the left occipital gyrus (t=-4.27), lingual gyrus (t=-4.55) and upper cerebellum (t=-3.54) (see Table 3 and Figure 2).