linguistic competence


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Related to linguistic competence: Linguistic performance, Communicative competence

linguistic competence

[liŋ‚gwis·tik ′kaäm·pə·təns]
(psychology)
The knowledge of language.
References in periodicals archive ?
Always in keeping with a communicative take on TFL, the former paradigm was dealt with thoroughly across the three stages of the didactic sequence around the development and/or consolidation of typical contents of the linguistic competence set for a B2 level--personality adjectives, modals, conditionals.
T5 pointed out that language and literature are connected and that you do not develop full linguistic competence if you do not have literature.
To provide effective mental health services to diverse populations in primary care settings, it is critical to adopt best practices in both integrated healthcare (IHC) and cultural and linguistic competence (CLC).
6) As we know, bilingual students in many countries do not receive instruction in their L1, which has negative consequences for their general linguistic competence.
Number of results above the average level for the group in all the sectors--common linguistic competence.
The exam targeting around 60,000 high school students in total aims to check their linguistic competence before the introduction of new English education guidelines for high schools from the next academic year, in which students will be required to speak in English during class hours in principle.
Starting with 1971 the latter rejects the restrictive notion of linguistic competence as explained by Chomsky on the grounds that it does not account for the cultural interpretation of meanings, nor for their negotiation.
KEY WORDS: philosophy of linguistics, linguistic competence, personal/subpersonal distinction, doxastic/subdoxastic distinction, propositional attitudes
In reality, FICCS also represents one of the possible answers to the question raised in the text, Service-Learning Across Cultures: Promise and Achievement (2004), which argues for the systematic evaluation of language acquisition by service-learning students because its results make evident that the combination of spontaneous acquisition (service) plus guided acquisition (learning) produces in the student a level of linguistic competence superior to that attainable in a solely academic context.
Essentially, linguistic competence is one, yet fundamental, component of overall communication competence.
For this reason, early research on this platform was directed to check not only the improvement in linguistic competence in the foreign language, but also to verify the success or otherwise of the learning process.
The question of linguistic competence therefore becomes irrelevant in the second language context where the speakers, rather than possess intuition have to learn the rules in the classroom.

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