lintel


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lintel,

in architecture, the horizontal member that spans an opening, such as a door or window, or that connects two columns. The post-and-lintel, or trabeated, system of construction, with spans limited to the length of available wood or stone beams, is the basis of the Egyptian and Greek styles of architecture, as contrasted with the later arched and vaulted, or arcuated, styles.
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Lintel

The horizontal beam that forms the upper structural member of an opening for a window or door and supports part of the structure above it.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Lintel

 

a structural member that spans the window and door openings in a wall and bears the load of the structures that rest on the lintel. Lintels are made of reinforced concrete, metal, wood, or brick. [19–1164—1]

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

lintel

[′lint·əl]
(building construction)
A horizontal member over an opening, such as a door or window, usually carrying the wall load.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

header joist, header, lintel, trimmer joist

header joist
header, 3
header, 1
A short structural member (as used in framing an opening) which is fastened between parallel full-length framing members at right angles to

lintel

A horizontal structural member (such as a beam) over an opening which carries the weight of the wall above it; usually of steel, stone, or wood. Also see door lintel, eyebrow lintel, fireplace lintel, splayed lintel, through lintel.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

lintel

a horizontal beam, as over a door or window
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

Lintel

(LINux InTEL) A Linux operating system running on Intel or AMD computers. Primarily a server environment, Lintel machines are used by the millions. See Linux, Wintel and Intel Mac.
Copyright © 1981-2019 by The Computer Language Company Inc. All Rights reserved. THIS DEFINITION IS FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY. All other reproduction is strictly prohibited without permission from the publisher.
References in periodicals archive ?
What are the implications if I do not replace my lintel? The most pressing concern with not replacing a lintel is the structural integrity to the masonry it is supporting.
The wheelhouse cornerstone and lintel were donated to the Black Tavern Historical Society by former Stevens Mill owner Jim Levin.
TALL ORDER: A lintel (inset) is lifted over the moat and through the temporary roof structure into Astley Castle
The wonderful church, with its low domes and bristling embroideries, the mystery of its mosaic and sculpture, looked ghostly in the tempered gloom, and the sea-breeze passed between the twin columns of the Piazzetta, the lintels of a door no longer guarded, as gently as if a rich curtain were swaying there.
Lintel group currently employs around 1,500 between its GSM operations andits telecom turn-key contractor, Linfra, which operates in 14 countriesacross the MENA and Africa.
Lintel deployments include 90 links of Eclipse radios, which are optimised for networks with flexible, high-bandwidth capabilities and native gigabit Ethernet interfaces.
The more organic form of the P&O wall fountain in Hunter Street, Sydney (1962-63), was a change in direction for Bass, and this period in his career included the design and construction of the copper lintel sculpture for the National Library of Australia (1967-68).
7 Cut the 2x6 post trim to fit directly under the lintel and screw it to the cedar 2x4s, keeping an even overhang on both sides.
/ Grass vests the dirt lest wind, twanging the skyscrapers // that merely sleeve the elevators, as we go sleeveless / except for the atmosphere, file it under "oceans." // Recalling the equations derived for ballistics- / aiming cannonballs is not like squaring lintels, // and skyscrapers are all lintel.
It is likely that hand trucks were required to move the bales, and more than one person would have been required to shift the massive "lintel" bales into place.
In much the same spirit, James Stirling would often frustrate lecture audiences by describing his buildings in the most straightforward terms ('This is a lintel ...') when they wanted him to philosophise verbally.