lipase


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Related to lipase: pancreatitis

lipase

(lī`pās), any enzymeenzyme,
biological catalyst. The term enzyme comes from zymosis, the Greek word for fermentation, a process accomplished by yeast cells and long known to the brewing industry, which occupied the attention of many 19th-century chemists.
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 capable of degrading lipidlipids,
a broad class of organic products found in living systems. Most are insoluble in water but soluble in nonpolar solvents. The definition excludes the mineral oils and other petroleum products obtained from fossil material.
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 molecules. The bulk of dietary lipids are a class called triacylglycerols and are attacked by lipases to yield simple fatty acidsfatty acid,
any of the organic carboxylic acids present in fats and oils as esters of glycerol. Molecular weights of fatty acids vary over a wide range. The carbon skeleton of any fatty acid is unbranched. Some fatty acids are saturated, i.e.
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 and glycerol, molecules which can permeate the membranes of the stomach and small intestine for use by the body. Gastric lipase, secreted by the stomach lining, has a pH value for optimal activity around neutrality and would appear, therefore, to be essentially inactive in the strongly acid environment of the stomach. It is suggested that this enzyme is more important for infant digestion since the gastric pH in infancy is much less acid than later in life. Most lipid digestion in the adult occurs in the upper loop of the small intestine and is accomplished by a lipase secreted by the pancreas. Phospholipases are the enzymes that degrade phospholipidsphospholipid
, lipid that in its simplest form is composed of glycerol bonded to two fatty acids and a phosphate group. The resulting compound called phosphatidic acid contains a region (the fatty acid component) that is fat-soluble along with a region (the charged phosphate
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.

lipase

[′lī‚pās]
(biochemistry)
An enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of fats or the breakdown of lipoproteins.

lipase

any of a group of fat-digesting enzymes produced in the stomach, pancreas, and liver and also occurring widely in the seeds of plants
References in periodicals archive ?
Hepatic lipase activity was measured using the enzymatic method worked by (Lott et al.
Lipase and phospholipase are abundantly found in animals, microorganisms and vegetables (Ejedegba et al.
Serum amylase and lipase levels are the most commonly requested investigations in the emergency department for the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis (AP).
However, the crucial disadvantages of feed in stability, odour and storage caused by the endogenous lipase preparations limits their utility as feed additives in livestock production [15].
The exon 8 of LPL gene is the key sequence for coding the catalytic center of lipoprotein lipase (Li et al.
We hypothesize that polymorphisms (rs320, rs285 and rs328) located in the lipoprotein lipase gene acts as exposure markers for development of stroke in Colombian population.
thuringensis TS11BP showed maximum lipase activity after 96 hr incubation (37).
3), it shows that serum amylase has increased more than >3 folds among 69 study participants and serum lipase has increased >3 folds among 77 study participants.
Literature reports various examples of lipase purification by using aqueous two phase systems (Table 1).
Os agentes da fermentacao foram os fungos filamentosos Aspergillus niger 11T53A14 (mutante obtido por tecnica convencional de exposicao a agente mutagenico) e Aspergillus niger C (selvagem), pertencentes a Colecao de Culturas da Embrapa Agroindustria de Alimentos e bons produtores de lipase (MURUCI et al.
The authors have organized the main body of their text in six chapters devoted to the fundamentals of enzymes, lipases, lipase immobilization, the kinetics of soluble and immobilized enzymes, and a variety of other related subjects.