lipase


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lipase

lipase (līˈpās), any enzyme capable of degrading lipid molecules. The bulk of dietary lipids are a class called triacylglycerols and are attacked by lipases to yield simple fatty acids and glycerol, molecules which can permeate the membranes of the stomach and small intestine for use by the body. Gastric lipase, secreted by the stomach lining, has a pH value for optimal activity around neutrality and would appear, therefore, to be essentially inactive in the strongly acid environment of the stomach. It is suggested that this enzyme is more important for infant digestion since the gastric pH in infancy is much less acid than later in life. Most lipid digestion in the adult occurs in the upper loop of the small intestine and is accomplished by a lipase secreted by the pancreas. Phospholipases are the enzymes that degrade phospholipids.
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lipase

[′lī‚pās]
(biochemistry)
An enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of fats or the breakdown of lipoproteins.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

lipase

any of a group of fat-digesting enzymes produced in the stomach, pancreas, and liver and also occurring widely in the seeds of plants
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
A new method for the measurement of lysosomal acid lipase in dried blood spots using the inhibitor Lalistat 2.
A new mutation in the gene for lysosomal acid lipase leads to Wolman disease in an African kindred.
The acidic heat-resistant lipase from microbial source used in this study was manufactured by Habio (Mianyang, China) and guaranteed to contain 10,000 U/g with its commercial name of Lipozyme.
Lipase enzymes help the body break down fats into smaller molecules called fatty acids and glycerol.
(1.) Htmes RW, Barlow SE, Bove K, Qutntantlh NM, Sheridan R, Kohh R Lysosomal Acid Lipase Deficiency Unmasked in Two Children with Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Pediatrics 2016, 138.
We gathered data on demographic information (age and gender), laboratory results (serum lipase level, white blood cell count, serum creatinine, and lactic acid), imaging studies supportive of SBO, cause of the obstruction when known, need for operative management, length of hospital stay, need for intensive care unit (ICU) care, and mortality.
Base change was found to be the possible cause of gain in function of LPL mRNA and resulted in lower susceptibility to inhibitrion for translation.5 The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship of lipoprotein lipase (LPL) gene polymorphism with serum contents of triglycerides and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol among hyperlipidemia families.
Currently, serum amylase and serum lipase are the most commonly used of these in clinical practice.
Indeed, this strain has a high capacity in the production of the lipase. And these dried Aspergillus niger cells could be efficiently immobilized within porous stainless steel cubes to catalyze the transesterification of WFO and WBF [27].
Although the technique of enzyme immobilization has become widespread, some commercial lipase enzyme products still exist in the free form--not immobilized [8, 9].
In this study, lipase production by Candida viswanathii was evaluated with different medium compositions using plant oils from the Amazonian region as sole carbon sources.
In the application of TA lipases for pharmaceutical commodity, immobilized lipase from Candida rugosa has also been used to synthesize lovastatin, a drug which reduces serum cholesterol levels [41].