lipogranuloma

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lipogranuloma

[‚lip·ə‚gran·yə′lō·mə]
(medicine)
A small mass of fatty tissue associated with granulomatous inflammation.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
* Lipogranulomas. These contain lipids and are associated with mineral oils in foods.
Furthermore, primary systemic sclerosing lipogranulomas may be associated with underlying systemic diseases such as lipid metabolism disorders, diabetes mellitus, and nephritic syndrome, which may cause lipid accumulation in tissues.
Lipogranulomas mostly occur in the genitourinary system, however, various organs such as the spleen, liver, mesentery, breast, scalp, eyelid, and nose have also been affected.
In the breast, lipogranulomas have been reported after the release of the silicone gel from breast implants, after the application of a traumatic treatment called "Bu-Hwang," and after phenothiazine therapy.
The enlarged mesenteric lymph nodes demonstrated reactive follicular hyperplasia and multifocal non-necrotizing lipogranulomas.
Other described histological reactions at injection sites include allergic contact dermatitis, lipogranulomas, local necrosis, sterile and infectious abscesses, necrotizing, necrobiotic and sarcoidal granulomas, cutaneous lymphoid hyperplasia, lupus profundus-like and morphea-like reactions.
Disseminated lipogranulomas and sudden death from self-administered mineral oil injection.
Lipogranulomas and pseudocystic cavities are characteristic of injection of oil-containing substances (paraffinoma).
The following morphologic features were assessed on blinded review by 1 hematopathologist (K.F.): red blood cell, neutrophil, lymphocyte, and platelet morphology (recorded as normal or abnormal) on the peripheral blood smear; percentage cellularity on the core biopsy, as well as assessment for any evidence of specific features including lipogranulomas, epithelioid granulomas, fibrosis or fat atrophy, lymphoid aggregates, or increased mast cells.
Likewise, lipogranulomas were identified in 6% (6 of 101) of the cases of CVD and were also found in 4 of the 38 controls (11%).
Prominent lipogranulomas may be seen in the testis, presumably as a reaction to sebaceous material leaked from the cyst contents (Figure 3, C).