liquefaction


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liquefaction,

change of a substance from the solid or the gaseous state to the liquid state. Since the different states of matter correspond to different amounts of energyenergy,
in physics, the ability or capacity to do work or to produce change. Forms of energy include heat, light, sound, electricity, and chemical energy. Energy and work are measured in the same units—foot-pounds, joules, ergs, or some other, depending on the system of
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 of the molecules making up the substance, energy in the form of heatheat,
nonmechanical energy in transit, associated with differences in temperature between a system and its surroundings or between parts of the same system. Measures of Heat
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 must either be supplied to a substance or be removed from the substance in order to change its state. Thus, changing a solid to a liquid or a liquid to a gas requires the addition of heat, while changing a gas to a liquid or a liquid to a solid requires the removal of heat. In the liquefaction of gases, extreme cooling is not necessary, for if a gas is held in a confined space and is subjected to high pressure, heat is given off as it undergoes compressioncompression,
external stress applied to an object or substance, tending to cause a decrease in volume (see pressure). Gases can be compressed easily, solids and liquids to a very small degree if at all.
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 and it turns eventually to a liquid. Some cooling is, however, necessary; it was discovered by Thomas Andrews in 1869 that each gas has a definite temperaturetemperature,
measure of the relative warmth or coolness of an object. Temperature is measured by means of a thermometer or other instrument having a scale calibrated in units called degrees. The size of a degree depends on the particular temperature scale being used.
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, called its critical temperature, above which it cannot be liquefied, no matter what pressure is exerted upon it. A gas must, therefore, be cooled below its critical temperature before it can be liquefied. When a gas is compressed its molecules are forced closer together and, their vibratory motion being reduced, heat is given off. As compression proceeds, the speed of the molecules and the distances between them continue to decrease, until eventually the substance undergoes change of state and becomes liquid. Although before the 19th cent. a number of scientists had experimented in liquefying gases, Davy and Faraday are usually credited with being the first to achieve success. The production of liquefied gases in large quantities (and consequently their use in refrigeration) was made possible by the work of Z. F. Wroblewski and K. S. Olszewski, two Polish scientists. The work of Sir James Dewar is also important, especially in the liquefaction of air and its change to a solid. Heike Kamerlingh Onnes first liquefied helium. The critical temperature of helium is −267.9°C;, only a few degrees above absolute zero (−273.15°C;). The processes for the liquefaction of gases as developed by Linde and others form the basis for those used in modern refrigerationrefrigeration,
process for drawing heat from substances to lower their temperature, often for purposes of preservation. Refrigeration in its modern, portable form also depends on insulating materials that are thin yet effective.
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. Liquefied gases are much used in low-temperature research; some, e.g., liquid oxygen, find use as rocket propellants. See liquid airliquid air,
ordinary air that has been liquefied by compression and cooling to extremely low temperatures (see liquefaction). Its commercial preparation involves purification by washing to remove soluble impurities and by passage over calcium oxide (lime) to remove the carbon
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; low-temperature physicslow-temperature physics,
science concerned with the production and maintenance of temperatures much below normal, down to almost absolute zero, and with various phenomena that occur only at such temperatures.
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liquefaction

[‚lik·wə′fak·shən]
(physics)
A change in the phase of a substance to the liquid state; usually, a change from the gaseous to the liquid state, especially of a substance which is a gas at normal pressure and temperature.

liquefaction

1. The sudden, large decrease of shearing resistance of a cohesionless soil caused by a collapse of the soil structure, produced by shock or small shear strains, associated with a sudden but temporary increase of pore water pressures.
2. The process of transforming a soil from a solid state to a liquid state, usually as a result of increased pore pressure and reduced shearing resistance. For example, an action in which a soil deposit (e.g., loose sand) loses its shear resistance temporarily and takes on the character of a liquid; such action, for example, may occur during an earthquake.
References in periodicals archive ?
CL-ML or ML) and high water content will be susceptible to liquefaction. However even if cohesive soil does not liquefy there can still be the possibility of a significant undrained shear strength loss due to seismic shaking (Day 2004).
The database of historical liquefaction in Italy Galli [19] demonstrates the existence of a relatively large number of weak to moderate earthquakes (MS > 4.2) producing liquefaction.
Cheniere is a full-service LNG provider, with capabilities that include gas procurement and transportation, liquefaction, vessel chartering, and LNG delivery.
'So, in case of liquefaction, the ground will soften, but the building will not be affected because it is anchored on solid ground,' Daag said.
The Phivolcs chief said they did not expect liquefaction to happen at an Intensity 5 quake.
The depth of the foundation must be examined, as well as the design of the basement to prevent that incident especially if there is a strong earthquake because that area is liquefaction-prone.) In 2015, Phivolc's Kathleen Papiona explained that "liquefaction is a phenomenon when loosely consolidated sediments soil deposits lost their strength and appeared to flow as fluids.
In conjunction, Cheniere Partners and Bechtel have now declared Substantial Completion on five liquefaction trains at the SPL Project ahead of each train's guaranteed completion date and within project budgets.
Nigeria will lead the Middle East and Africa in terms of liquefaction capacity additions.
All the liquefaction experiments were carried out in an autoclave of 500 mL capacity.
* Planned capital expenditure spending on new LNG liquefaction and regasification projects by region, key countries and companies
Organic solvent liquefaction, pyrolysis, and hydrothermal liquefaction are thermomechanical conversion techniques to convert forest biomass into a liquid product called "bio-oil." High hydroxyl (OH) functionality of bio-oil makes it a great candidate to be used as a bio-based polyol to synthesize a variety of polymers, including phenolic resins (Alma and Basturk 2006), polyurethane (Hu and Li 2014), epoxy resin (Kuo et al.
(NYSE: KMI) and Anglo-Dutch oil and gas company Shell (NYSE: RDS.B) have reached an agreement for Kinder Morgan to purchase 100% of Shell's equity interest in Elba Liquefaction Co., LLC, the companies said.