liquid insulator

liquid insulator

[′lik·wəd ′in·sə‚lād·ər]
(materials)
A liquid with a resistivity greater than about 1014 ohm-centimeters, such as a petroleum oil, silicone oil, or halogenated aromatic hydrocarbon.
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(Adapted with the permission of Worm Watch magazine, March/April 2000 and World Watch Institute [c] 2000, Washington, D.C.) Material Date of Introduction Cumulative World Production (tons) Aldrin (insecticide) 1949 240,000 Chlordane (insecticide) 1945 70,000 DDT (insecticide) 1942 2.8-3 million Dieldrin (Insecticide) 1948 240,000 Endrin (insecticide) 1951 (3,119 tons in 1997 Heptachlor (insecticide) 1948 (900 tons used in 1974 in the U.S.) Hexachlorobenzene 1945 1-2 million (fungicide and by-product of pesticide production) Mirex[TM] (insecticide 1959 No data and flame retardant) Toxaphene[TM] (insecticide 1948 1.33 million PCB's (liquid insulators 1929 1-2 million in transformers, hydraulic fluids; ingredients in some paints.
Among the non-chlorinated POPs are various organometals (used, for example, in marine pai nts) and organobromines (used as pesticides and as liquid insulators in electrical equipment).
A more obscure array of POPs involves a family of organochlorines that have been used as liquid insulators in electrical equipment, as hydraulic fluids, and as trace additives to plastics, paints, even carbonless copy paper.