list


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list

1
Computing a linearly ordered data structure

list

2
1. a strip of bark, sapwood, etc., trimmed from a board or plank
2. another word for fillet

list

3
the act or an instance of a ship leaning to one side

list

[list]
(computer science)
A last-in, first-out storage organization, usually implemented by software, but sometimes implemented by hardware.
In FORTRAN, a set of data items to be read or written.
(engineering)
To lean to one side, or deviate from the vertical.

fillet

fillet, 1
1. A molding consisting of a narrow flat band, often square in section; the term is loosely applied to almost any rectangular molding; usually used in conjunction with or to separate other moldings or ornaments, as the stria between the flutes of columns. Also see band, lattice molding, fret, reglet, annulet, supercilium, taenia, cincture, cimbia, fascia, and platband; a listel, or tringle.
2. A carved ornament representing a flowing band or ribbon.
3. In stair construction, a thin narrow strip of wood which fits into the groove of the stair shoe or subrail between balusters.
4. A cant strip.
5. A concave junction where two surfaces meet. (See illustration p. 398.)

list

(data)
A data structure holding many values, possibly of different types, which is usually accessed sequentially, working from the head to the end of the tail - an "ordered list". This contrasts with a (one-dimensional) array, any element of which can be accessed equally quickly.

Lists are often stored using a cell and pointer arrangement where each value is stored in a cell along with an associated pointer to the next cell. A special pointer, e.g. zero, marks the end of the list. This is known as a (singly) "linked list". A doubly linked list has pointers from each cell to both next and previous cells.

An unordered list is a set.

list

(1) An arranged set of data, often in row and column format.

(2) In fourth-generation languages, a command that displays/prints selected records. For example, in dBASE, list name address displays all names and addresses in the current file.
References in classic literature ?
Alice watched the White Rabbit as he fumbled over the list, feeling very curious to see what the next witness would be like,
He asked Philip's name and looked at a list on the board.
I comfort myself and you with the hope that your son is alive, for otherwise he would have been mentioned among the officers found on the field of battle, a list of whom has been sent me under flag of truce.
The list of the survivors followed, beginning with the officers in the order of their rank.
Sir John," said the prince as he rode through the winding streets on his way to the list, "I should have been glad to have splintered a lance to-day.
But we don't really know anything about it and won't until the pass list is out.
The list of assignments and questions at the end is intended, of course, to be freely treated.
Of these, her grandfather was one; the others she recognised as the first card-players at the public-house on the eventful night of the storm--the man whom they had called Isaac List, and his gruff companion.
Those banks of beautiful ladies, shining in their barbaric splendors, would see a knight sprawl from his horse in the lists with a lance- shaft the thickness of your ankle clean through him and the blood spouting, and instead of fainting they would clap their hands and crowd each other for a better view; only sometimes one would dive into her handkerchief, and look ostentatiously broken-hearted, and then you could lay two to one that there was a scandal there somewhere and she was afraid the public hadn't found it out.
That, the evidence of these two witnesses, coupled with the documents of their discovering that would be produced, would show the prisoner to have been furnished with lists of his Majesty's forces, and of their disposition and preparation, both by sea and land, and would leave no doubt that he had habitually conveyed such information to a hostile power.
The Passage of Arms, as it was called, which was to take place at Ashby, in the county of Leicester, as champions of the first renown were to take the field in the presence of Prince John himself, who was expected to grace the lists, had attracted universal attention, and an immense confluence of persons of all ranks hastened upon the appointed morning to the place of combat.
The winners then saluted the King and Queen, and withdrew for a space to rest and renew their bow-strings for the keenest contest of all; while the lists were cleared and a new target--the open one--was set up at twelvescore paces.