listeriosis


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listeriosis

a serious form of food poisoning, caused by bacteria of the genus Listeria. Its symptoms can include meningitis and in pregnant women it may cause damage to the fetus

Listeriosis

 

listerellosis, an acute infectious natural-focus zoonosis-type disease of man and animals caused by the microorganism Listeria monocytogenes.

Murine rodents are the natural reservoirs of listeriosis. The causative agent is also discharged by the tick Ixodes persulcatus. Persons are usually infected through animals upon ingesting Listeria-infested milk, meat, or eggs, from the bite of infected arthropods, or through the respiratory tract. The disease is found sporadically in various countries of Europe, Africa, America, and Australia and, occasionally, in the USSR. The disease appears after an incubation period that lasts a minimum of two weeks. The course takes a variety of clinical forms. Diagnosis is established on the basis of bacteriological investigations of the discharges of the tonsils, blood, cerebrospinal fluid, and amniotic fluid. In infants, meconium and mucus from the pharynx and nose are examined. Listeriosis is treated with antibiotics, and it is prevented by following veterinary sanitation and interrupting the paths of transmission of the infection.

REFERENCE

Tripolitova, A. A., and G. V. Borisova. Listerioz. Tomsk, 1965. (Bibliography.)
N. D. MIKERINA
The majority of farm animals and many wild animals are subject to infection with listeriosis. Young and pregnant animals are especially sensitive. Infected animals are the source of the causative agent, releasing Listeria along with nasal discharges, feces, urine, the genital discharges that accompany listeriotic abortions, and milk (with listeriotic mastitides). Sheep are most commonly affected; here the disease is seasonal (winter-spring), a consequence of the activation of the transmissive factor of the causative agent (the migration of infected rodents to fodder stores) and of a decrease in the animals’ resistance (connected with changes in the conditions of keeping and feeding and with pregnancy). One of the factors in transmitting Listeria is silage, in which the organisms find favorable conditions for multiplying and accumulating.
Listeriosis in animals occurs sporadically (less often, epizootically). Confinement is usual, because of the presence of animal carriers, the prolonged viability of Listeria in the environment, and the existence of natural foci. The disease may proceed acutely, subacutely, or, more rarely, chronically. Nervous, septicemic, mixed, erosive, and asymptomatic (carrier) forms are distinguished. The genital system can also be affected (abortions, placental retention, endometritides, and metritides), and there are listeriotic mastitides. Diagnosis is established on the basis of a complex of epizootological data, the clinical picture, and bacteriological investigations. Prevention entails supplying farms with animals from more favorable areas, conducting investigations to discover animals that may be carriers or are affected with the latent form of the disease, controlling rodents, and vaccinating the animals.

REFERENCE

Bakulov, I. A. Listerioz sel’skokhoziaistvennykh zhivotnykh. Moscow, 1967.

I. A. BAKULOV

listeriosis

[li‚stir·ē′ō·səs]
(medicine)
A bacterial disease of humans and some animals caused by Listeria monocytogenes; occurs primarily as meningitis or granulomatosis infantiseptica in humans, and takes many forms, such as meningoencephalitis, distemperlike disease, or generalized infection, in animals.
References in periodicals archive ?
Of those who contract listeriosis, one of every four dies.
Listeriosis claims an estimated 425 lives a year, about 23 percent of the 1,850 people who become ill, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
Listeria was traced to coleslaw served in Nova Scotia that caused 41 cases of listeriosis and 14 deaths.
He stressed that they have also rolled out surveillance of symptoms that could be linked to or be likened to those of listeriosis whilst also partnering with the Department of Disease Control in South Africa since the beginning of listeriosis outbreak threat in January 2017.
She continues: 'Should a breadwinner who had a duty to support dependents and was in fact so supporting them, pass away as a result of contracting Listeriosis, those dependents may have a claim for the lost financial support which they have suffered as a result.
In an interview, Senn Foods production manager, Mr Mike De-Witt said he was aware that the current outbreak of Listeriosis, being a food-borne illness, has understandably led to some concerns from consumers that their products may be affected, but noted that their products were safe to eat.
Listeriosis poses a higher risk for newborns, the elderly, pregnant women, and persons with weak immunity, he said.
The death toll from an outbreak of listeriosis has risen to 60 in South Africa, the National Institute for Communicable Diseases (NICD) of South Africa said.
However, listeriosis can be treated with the use of antibiotics.
Ready to eat foods are those that do not require preparation by heat employment before being ingested by the consumer, and mostly those made from meat, dairy products and smoked fish were most often related to listeriosis outbreaks in Canada, European Union and United States, countries where the notification of this disease is compulsory (MCLAUCHLIN et al.