litany

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litany

(lĭt`ənē) [Gr.,=prayer], solemn prayer characterized by varying petitions with set responses. The term is mainly used for Christian forms. Litanies were developed in Christendom for use in processions. In the West there were traditionally four days for these processional litanies, the Rogation DaysRogation Days,
in the calendar of the Western Church, four days traditionally set apart for solemn processions to invoke God's mercy. They are Apr. 25, the Major Rogation, coinciding with St. Mark's Day; and the three days preceding Ascension Day, the Minor Rogations.
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. The Eastern liturgies make frequent use of litanies, recited by the deacon; the response is usually "Lord, have mercy." The Kyrie eleisonKyrie eleison
[Gr.,=Lord, have mercy], in the Roman Catholic Church, prayer of the Mass coming after the introit, the only ordinary part of the traditional liturgy said not in Latin but in Greek.
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 is a relic of such a litany. In the Roman Catholic Church the one liturgical litany, the Litany of the Saints, dates from the 5th cent. substantially. Modeled after it are a number of nonliturgical (i.e., nonprescribed) litanies, of which the following are authorized: Litany of the Holy Name of Jesus (15th cent.), Litany of the Blessed Virgin Mary (or of Loreto; 16th cent.), Litany of the Sacred Heart, and Litany of St. Joseph. The litany in the Anglican Book of Common Prayer is much like the Litany of the Saints. Moravian and Lutheran liturgies also use litanies.

Litany

 

in Catholicism, a type of prayer that is sung or read during solemn religious processions.

litany

Christianity
a. a form of prayer consisting of a series of invocations, each followed by an unvarying response
b. the Litany the general supplication in this form included in the Book of Common Prayer
References in periodicals archive ?
For example, Haskin sees more similarity in Donne's stanza form to Spenser's in The Faerie Queene and The Shepheardes Calendar than to past litanies, further stating, "Donne in particular is an oddly shaped peg" whom scholars often try to hammer into the uniform holes of Protestantism or Catholicism (54, 183).
However, originally, the medieval litanies had ended with the Kyrie Eleison of Section 4.
1) This includes the Sarum litany for Rogation Monday (similar to the present Roman Catholic Litany of the Saints); an eighth-century litany from the pontifical of Egbert, Archbishop of York; a medieval litany from Germany revised by Luther in 1528 or 1529 (published in both German and Latin); a German litany drawn up in 1543 by Phillip Melancthon and Martin Bucer for a prayer book commissioned by Archbishop Hermann of Cologne; the litany in Marshall's Primer of 1535; the 5th volume of a collection by Genricus Canisuius entitled Antiquae Lectiones (including litanies of Ratpertus and Notker); and certain Greek litanies originating in the Orthodox Church.
3) However, the serious nature of contemporary litanies by Sir Phillip Sidney, Fulke Greville, Robert Herrick, and Samuel Speed call this pejorative claim into serious question.
In a meditative spirit different from the playful, philosophical musings of his earlier paintings, Bruce Bobick's Litanies are accretive and collage-like, combining watercolor with disparate elements, such as lace, shells, strings, ribbons, cloth, even a baby's shoe.
Bobick's Litanies are a visible and devotional stream-of-consciousness.
Rayl outlines Charpentier's life and career, and then attempts to divide the different litanies into either petits motets or grands motets.
Rayl carefully places the text of the Litanies in its liturgical and historical context.
Accompanying the sculpture is a "Statement of Esthetic Withdrawal," a notarized document that reads in part: "Robert Morris, being the marker of the metal construction LITANIES .
Whether we're talking about the songs of children skipping rope, the rhythmic blues of a road gang laying asphalt under an August sun, or the chanted litanies of a church procession on the solemnity of Corpus Christi, we like music because it has a beat and because it sings out the sounds of our bodies at work and play.