litany


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

litany

(lĭt`ənē) [Gr.,=prayer], solemn prayer characterized by varying petitions with set responses. The term is mainly used for Christian forms. Litanies were developed in Christendom for use in processions. In the West there were traditionally four days for these processional litanies, the Rogation DaysRogation Days,
in the calendar of the Western Church, four days traditionally set apart for solemn processions to invoke God's mercy. They are Apr. 25, the Major Rogation, coinciding with St. Mark's Day; and the three days preceding Ascension Day, the Minor Rogations.
..... Click the link for more information.
. The Eastern liturgies make frequent use of litanies, recited by the deacon; the response is usually "Lord, have mercy." The Kyrie eleisonKyrie eleison
[Gr.,=Lord, have mercy], in the Roman Catholic Church, prayer of the Mass coming after the introit, the only ordinary part of the traditional liturgy said not in Latin but in Greek.
..... Click the link for more information.
 is a relic of such a litany. In the Roman Catholic Church the one liturgical litany, the Litany of the Saints, dates from the 5th cent. substantially. Modeled after it are a number of nonliturgical (i.e., nonprescribed) litanies, of which the following are authorized: Litany of the Holy Name of Jesus (15th cent.), Litany of the Blessed Virgin Mary (or of Loreto; 16th cent.), Litany of the Sacred Heart, and Litany of St. Joseph. The litany in the Anglican Book of Common Prayer is much like the Litany of the Saints. Moravian and Lutheran liturgies also use litanies.

Litany

 

in Catholicism, a type of prayer that is sung or read during solemn religious processions.

litany

Christianity
a. a form of prayer consisting of a series of invocations, each followed by an unvarying response
b. the Litany the general supplication in this form included in the Book of Common Prayer
References in periodicals archive ?
In a press statement Sunday, the detained senator said she expected nothing but lies and a litany justifying the extrajudicial killings.
Despite being embroiled in Anglican theological controversy, he was not to enter the Anglican priesthood until some five or six years after completing "A Litany," marking it as one of his earliest religious poems.
But the decision formalises that, and means these state workers may be without pay for an extended period, adding to a litany of problems of living in conflict-hit areas.
At the litany level, a problem in the United States is the more than 100,000 deaths per year related to medical mistakes.
The Chargers haven't gotten any traction in San Diego, Oakland just shrugged its shoulders this week when the A's announced plans to build a stadium 25 miles away in Fremont, and then there is the litany of locales around here -- Carson, Anaheim, Pasadena and Los Angeles -- whose best offer is to check under the sofa cushions for loose change.
Chapters include a Magdalene litany for turning oneself over to become a vessel for Divine Feminine grace, teachings on enlightenment Jesus is said to have imparted to Magdalene alone, a guide to creating one's personal shrine to Mary Magdalene, and much more.
Their detective heroes' names read like a litany of murder mystery nabobs: Doctor Coffin, Duffy Kildare, Dr.
I asked her to correct my port de bras, and she gave me a gentle litany of reminders: "Chin up, hips forward, ribs in, earring to the ceiling.
Among the papers, security agents working on the investigation of the archive found records of a litany of abuses of more than 200,000 civilians who died or disappeared during the war.
Albin has handled a litany of state and federal real estate and landlord-tenant cases: declaratory judgments; injunctive actions; foreclosures; bankruptcies; workouts; real estate transactions; and the representation of owners, lenders, receivers and the various cooperative and condominium boards.
The crowd stirs as Uladia Taylor rattles off an almost indecipherable litany of items and corresponding bids.
Rowling's magical saga adds the demons of adolescence to the litany of monsters confronting school chums Harry (Daniel Radcliffe), Ron (Rupert Grintt), and Hermione (Emma Watson) in this PG-13 tale of dragons, deep sea creatures, and deadly mazes--oh my