literate programming


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literate programming

(programming, text)
Combining the use of a text formatting language such as TeX and a conventional programming language so as to maintain documentation and source code together.

Literate programming may use the inverse comment convention.

Perl's literate programming system is called pod.
This article is provided by FOLDOC - Free Online Dictionary of Computing (foldoc.org)
References in periodicals archive ?
Unlike similar self-study books, this primer uses 'literate programming techniques' to present its sample code, and is arranged with an undergrad data course user in mind.
LITERATE PROGRAMMING: AN ASSESSMENT When Donald Knuth wrote the [T.sub.E]X[TM] program, one of his goals was to publish it as a program "of which a professor of computer science might be proud, in spite of the fact that it meets real-world constraints and compromises" [2, p.
SPIDER should make one literate programming tool, WEB, available to a much larger audience.
Overview So far, all reviews of literate programs in Communications have criticized the content rather than the use of literate programming itself.
Moderator's Introduction to Column 2 Judging from the amount of mail I received about Column 1, the readership of "Literate Programming" is gratifyingly large.
Index to Communications of the ACM Volume 30, 1987 BIBLIOGRAPHY AUTHOR INDEX ARTICLE INDEX REPORT INDEX COMPUTING PRACTICES INDEX RESEARCH CONTRIBUTION INDEX EDITORIALS, VIEWPOINTS, PRESIDENTS LETTERS, FROM WASHINGTON INDEX PROGRAMMING PEARLS INDEX LITERATE PROGRAMMING INDEX ACM FORUM INDEX TECHNICAL CORRESPONDENCE INDEX OBITUARY
A new section on "Literate Programming" debuts in this issue of Communications.
With his help, we commissioned Christopher Van Wyk of AT&T Bell laboratories to be the moderator of a new column on literate programming, inaugurated with this issue.
Several readers wondered how well a small example can serve to illustrate the features of system for literate programming. The issue arose in two very different ways: One reader who though WEB worked acceptably in the small doubted that it would serve a large project well; another sugrested that the WEB solution's apparent clumsiness in the small could be attributed to its being designed for larger, more complex programs.