lithocholic acid


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lithocholic acid

[¦lith·ə¦kä·lik ′as·əd]
(biochemistry)
C24H40O3 A crystalline substance with a melting point of 184-186°C; soluble in hot alcohol; found in ox, human, and rabbit bile.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Suidasari et al., "Consumption of vitamin b6 reduces fecal ratio of lithocholic acid to deoxycholic acid, a risk factor for colon cancer, in rats fed a high-fat diet," Journal of Nutritional Science and Vitaminology, vol.
The mechanism of vitamin D's association with a lower colon cancer risk was not understood until recently when it was discovered that laboratory animals given doses of vitamin D and then given lithocholic acid do not get colon cancer.
The study reveals that the body's natural mechanisms are not built to handle lithocholic acid, a toxic by-product of dietary fat, in the volume generated by high-fat diets.
Most of these acids are reabsorbed by the small or large intestines, but one, lithocholic acid, isn't readily taken up there.
Significant proportions of CDCA and CA are then converted in the respective secondary lithocholic acid (LCA) and deoxycholic acid (DCA) by resident bacteria [2].
Nrf2-KO mice treated with lithocholic acid (LCA, a toxic bile acid) compared to wild-type mice had severe multifocal liver necrosis and increased inflammation and serum ALT levels [124].
External bile acid standards, including cholic acid (CA), lithocholic acid (LCA), chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), deoxycholic acid (DCA), ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), [alpha]-muricholic acid ([alpha]MCA), [beta]-muricholic acid ([beta]MCA), [omega]-muricholic acid ([omega]MCA), glycocholic acid (GCA), glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDCA), taurocholic acid (TCA), taurodeoxycholic acid (TDCA), tauro chenodeoxycholic acid (TCDCA), taurolithocholic acid (TLCA), tauro-[alpha]-muricholic acid (T[alpha]MCA), and tauro-[beta]-muricholic acid (T[beta]MCA), were purchased from Sigma-Aldrich.
The non-steroidal ligands may be important tools for studying the pharmacology of the receptor, because they may not have the property of bile acids and are not metabolized to form harmful lithocholic acid (Fischer et al., 1996; Javitt, 1966).
However, treatment of PX[R.sup.-/-] animals with the toxic endogenous bile acid lithocholic acid led to severe liver damage compared with control animals (Standinger et al.
For example, chenodeoxycholic and lithocholic acids are cytotoxic and have detergent effects.