lithographic plate

lithographic plate

[‚lith·ə′graf·ik ′plāt]
(graphic arts)
A metal plate, usually having little porosity, on which an image is produced for lithographic printing.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Mendez laboriously transferred Rodriguez's image, which depicts a mirror inside the artist's studio, from a Xerox print onto an aluminum lithographic plate, to whose surface some pulp remained adhered.
Prints usually have the artist's signature on them--either done by hand after the print is done, in the lithographic plate itself, or in some case, both.
Prints usually have the artist's signature on them -- either done by hand after the print is done, in the lithographic plate itself, or in some cases, both.
As part of its overall R&D program, Novelis said its scientists are working on a "radically different product" that will be much quicker and easier for lithographic plate producers to prepare for use, saving significant electrical energy and shortening process times.
Such "di-litho" printing uses letterpress equipment to print directly from a lithographic plate rather than from an ink film first transferred (offset) onto a printing blanket.
The publication was planned during Matisse's lifetime and the first lithographic plates were prepared under his direction a few days before he died.
Genevieve learned to draw on lithographic plates (the originals were 15.4 x 17.3 inches and the lithograph stones weighed 65 pounds), which were sent to Cincinnati for printing and then returned as black-and-white prints that were individually hand-colored.
Design2print, which holds FSC accreditation, sends 104 tonnes of paper and more than 12,000 lithographic plates for reprocessing.
Though I hate the practice of breaking books, rescuing the 20 splendid lithographic plates Agnes's tour de force contains is the literary equivalent to putting a horse down when it has broken its leg.
Balzac uttered the 'terrifying thought' that his fellow Parisians were growing akin to 'lithographic plates from which an infinite number of copies can be taken through malicious gossiping'.