lithographic stone

lithographic stone

[‚lith·ə′graf·ik ′stōn]
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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They were created through a painstaking process where a picture would start life as a black and white negative and each new colour would be added using a different asphalt-coated lithographic stone.
Each picture starts as a black and white negative and each new colour was added using a different asphalt-coated lithographic stone. The result is a cross between a photograph and a painting that depicts famous Welsh towns, landscapes and buildings in a unique way.
The image starts out as a black and white negative then each new colour is added using a different asphaltcoated lithographic stone.
It is therefore our opinion that the coloring was added by a lithographic stone created from the original etching after Picasso's time.
Atif Khan has made his mark by broadening the traditional definition of making prints which previously was by work on the etching plate or the lithographic stone. He focusses on layering the print with readymade stamps and stencils and is known for his innovative approach to the printmakers repertoire.
"From the time I took my nose off that lithographic stone, I have had no master, and never shall have any," he commented years later.
Some of the drawings were signed by Carswell and some annotated as drawn directly onto the lithographic stone. Some were drawn on the stone by Haghe and he neglected to reverse the lesions in the medulla when doing the illustrations of MS.
The pictures were created using the photochrome process in which an original negative was transferred onto a lithographic stone.
If Newman could conflate imagemaking and writing through the agency of the lithographic stone, then it can be said that the wall plane, across which Bochner applied his pigment, is as much a space of writing as of painting.
The text from the programming guide to the 2001 exhibition, The Prairie Print Makers, eloquently describes Wengenroth's enormous artistic ability: "Few artists have coaxed more from the lithographic stone. Whether portraying the magnificence of the Brooklyn Bridge, the particulars of New England houses, churches, and coastline, or the personalities of birds, he is perfectly attuned to all the resources of the medium and his execution demonstrates pure craftsmanship."
Working carefully on the sensitive surface of the lithographic stone, he used a blunt crayon for darker tones, a thinner and sharper crayon for lighter tones, and needle or knife blade to accent selected bellies.
The pictures would start life as a black and white negative and each new colour would be added using a print from a different asphaltcoated lithographic stone.