lithostatic pressure

lithostatic pressure

[¦lith·ə¦stad·ik ′presh·ər]
(geophysics)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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Lithostatic pressure is equivalent to the total charge of the overlaying sediments in a geological formation and increases according to the lithostatic pressure gradient (23 MPa/Km) [10-12, 57].
(9) The aquifer is confined, such that we have a permeability barrier, such that, after the closure of the boreholes, as the fluid pressure will increase in a rock, the fluid pressure approaches the lithostatic pressure and the forces act at the sediment grain contact.
Even the stable salt access roads are under high lithostatic pressure, because of the depth of the workings, and long horizontal slots are cut into the sides of the roadways to relieve stress.
"The big finding is that there is very high fluid pressure down there, that is, lithostatic pressure, which means pressure equivalent to the load of all rock above it, 15 to 30 kilometers (10 to 20 miles) of rock," Nadeau said.
An average rhyolitic magma undersaturated in water remains under lithostatic pressure until saturation is reached.
Test results reveal: 1) maximum water table height and pore-water pressure occur when the sand column is approximately twice the initial water table height, 2) pore-water pressure remains high long after the shaking ceases, apparently due to the elevated water table, 3) with an impermeable layer the pore-water pressure continues to rise as the sand height increases, 4) with an impermeable layer pore-water pressure remains high long after the shaking ceases, apparently due to the lithostatic pressure of the sand column above the impermeable layer, 5 ) sand compaction occurs beneath the water table, and 6) the amount of sand compaction is controlled by initial water table height.
Since all deposited transuranic waste must be retrievable during the initial five-year operating period, the boreholes have steel sleeves that withstand salt lithostatic pressure to ease retrieval.
At the onset of simulation time, fluid within the intrusion is set to a temperature of 900[degrees]C and lithostatic pressure, describing an instantaneous intrusion of magma into the upper crust.
During extraction of samples from great depths and their release from lithostatic pressure, many microfractures are formed at grain boundaries and inside grains.
In general, hydrostatic pressure and lithostatic pressure are used to estimate the mineralization depth.