Litter

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litter

1. a group of offspring produced at one birth by a mammal such as a sow
2. a layer of partly decomposed leaves, twigs, etc., on the ground in a wood or forest

Litter

 

a layer of the remains of dead plants on the soil surface in a forest, meadow, or steppe. Its thickness varies from a fraction of a centimeter to 30 cm or greater. In spruce forests of the taiga zone, there are 40–80 tons of litter per hectare (ha), and in oak forests of the forest steppe 8–15 tons per ha.


Litter

 

the dead branches, leaves, and other parts of plants that have fallen onto the ground or the bottom of a body of water. The annual accumulation of such organic matter on the soil surface and in the forest is called litter.

References in periodicals archive ?
NCGA's structure is unique and very different from other commodity associations," says Litterer.
Lewicki & Litterer (1985) declare that sites are not inherently neutral, they are perceived as neutral; a lounge is not inherently "warm" or "cold", but rather perceived that way by virtue of the decor that is used.
Jelinek and Litterer (1995) argue that entrepreneurial organizations offer exactly such cues.
The research found that the primary litterers were young men, ages 18 to 34, and a bit more blue collar than white collar.
This strategy is most common where the goals of one side are perceived to be in fundamental opposition to the goals of the other, or where resources are limited, and each party seeks to maximize its own share (Lewicki & Litterer, 1985; Thomas, 1990).
Q: Well, considering that you're the world's most famous litterer, the issue must have had special resonance.
There was a time I wouldn't have thought twice about saying something to a litterer, but obviously I've devolved (is that a word?
Chandler, 1977), and others have acknowledged the linkage between industrial systems and the labor struggle (Bendix, 1974; Braverman, 1974; Marglin, 1974; Stone, 1974; Edwards, 1979; Litterer, 1986; Barley and Kunda, 1992; Guillen, 1994), no quantitative evidence has yet been offered to support this hypothesis.
The article by Jelinek and Litterer summarizes and interprets their previous research, posing somewhat of a dilemma in classifying the epistemological dimension of their work.
Similar fines will be given to every filthy spitter and litterer, with traffic wardens redeployed to enforce compliance while retired Sergeant Majors will make these 'orrible people clean up their mess - with a toothbrush for their first offence and their tongues for a second and all subsequent ones.
There was a time when a litterer or an unscrupulous developer in Fulton County, Ga.
But hierarchically superior members can and do get involved in operations, while those at lower levels have important roles to play in strategy (Jelinek & Litterer, 1992).