live-virus vaccine

live-virus vaccine

[′līv ¦vī·rəs vak′sēn]
(immunology)
A suspension of attenuated live viruses injected to produce immunity.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hurley described another big advantage of the investigational vaccine, in addition to its almost-too-good-to-be-true efficacy: the fact that, unlike Zostavax, it's not a live-virus vaccine.
Health professionals have always known of an inherent risk of polio from live-virus vaccine.
Jonas Salk produced an injectable, killed-virus vaccine; Albert Sabin promoted an oral, live-virus vaccine.
The FDA has not approved this live-virus vaccine for use in pregnant women and immunocompromised persons, including transplant recipients and persons receiving corticosteroid therapy.
Because the immune systems of HIV-positive people may not be able to fight off the effects of active pathogens, doctors say they should never get a live-virus vaccine.
This live-virus vaccine may be given any time after the first birthday.
While the current flu shot, made from a killed virus, is about 70 percent effective, researchers hope the live-virus vaccine will provide a more ``well- rounded, robust immunological response and afford better protection,'' said Dr.
ACAM2000 is a live-virus vaccine indicated for active immunization against smallpox.
He advises waiting 2 years before immunizing patients with live vaccines such as MMR--the only live-virus vaccine shown to be safe for this patient group.
The currently licensed smallpox vaccine is a live-virus vaccine related to smallpox (Variola) virus; there is no smallpox virus in the vaccine.