live

(redirected from lives)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Acronyms, Idioms, Wikipedia.
Related to lives: levis

live

1. (esp of a volcano) not extinct
2. of a record
a. recorded in concert
b. recorded in one studio take, without overdubs or splicing
3. connected to a source of electric power
4. being in a state of motion or transmitting power; positively connected to a driving member
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

live

[līv]
(communications)
Being broadcast directly at the time of production, instead of from recorded or filmed program material.
(electricity)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

live

1. Connected to a source of voltage.
2. Said of a room having an unusually small amount of sound absorption.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

live

(1) An event that is broadcast or recorded as it happens. See real time.

(2) See Windows Live, Office Live and Samsung Gear Live.
Copyright © 1981-2019 by The Computer Language Company Inc. All Rights reserved. THIS DEFINITION IS FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY. All other reproduction is strictly prohibited without permission from the publisher.
References in periodicals archive ?
The South and North, therefore, are portrayed in Grange's first two lives as dehumanized and dehumanizing environments.
Given that it grows from the tidewaters of southern Virginia around the Gulf of Mexico to Texas, the live oak is able to tolerate salt spray better than most oaks.
The National Conference of Catholic Bishops correctly termed the Bush position "morally unacceptable," adding: "We hope and pray that President Bush will return to a principled stand against treating some human lives as nothing more than objects to be manipulated and destroyed for research purposes.
Were these cells the only hope for curing certain diseases or saving particular lives, we could not morally harvest them.
The ancient Hebrews believed it was possible to learn how to live a good, peaceful, and happy life.
Like most people who live to be 100 or older, my great-grandmother was ill only in the last few years of her life.
ILP includes the multiple dimensions of lives (body, mind, spirit), life roles (love, learning, labor, leisure, and citizenship), cultures (individualistic and communal), gender (self-sufficiency and connectedness for both women and men), communities (global and local), ways of thinking (rational and intuitive), ways of knowing (qualitative and quantitative; Hansen, 1997), and linking personal and career isues (Subich, 1993).
The monastic life doesn't teach us how to cope with our lives by offering us a respite once a week where we hear how terrible life is "out there" and how beautiful it is "in here." Nor does it flatten religion to acts of social justice and community service, drawing the curtain that separates the holy from the secular, attempting to make both holy and, in doing so, making neither holy.
For an elderly person or someone without children, the decision to sell a life insurance policy to pay medical bills and live life to its fullest may be an easy one.
These changes and disruptions are based on the assumption that most young adults with mental retardation continue to live at home for five to ten years after leaving the school system (Peraino, 1992).
Women who had cared for their families all their lives and continued to do so into old age experienced the last stage of their life as a period of happiness and fulfillment.
The most important aspect of this ralationship has been the development of mutual respect between IL center and VR office staff, which ultimately provides the consumer with a better opportunity to achieve his/her vocational goal, to go to work, and to live more independently.