living


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living

1. (of animals or plants) existing in the present age; extant
2. presented by actors before a live audience
3. Church of England another term for benefice
References in classic literature ?
"For the living know that they shall die; but the dead know not anything, neither have they any more a reward; for the memory of them is forgotten.
See what comes of living in the provinces--you know nothing about anything.
When we consider what, to use the words of the catechism, is the chief end of man, and what are the true necessaries and means of life, it appears as if men had deliberately chosen the common mode of living because they preferred it to any other.
"But what do you mean by living only for yourself?" asked Pierre, growing excited.
'But I must go on living. And I, who thought I knew everything, who taught others how to live--I know nothing and ask you to teach me.'
The living thing did I follow; I walked in the broadest and narrowest paths to learn its nature.
Who would feel any great surprise at hearing that the Magalonyx was formerly rare compared with the Megatherium, or that one of the fossil monkeys was few in number compared with one of the now living monkeys?
Torn in her own lifetime from the list of the living, the daughter of Philip Fairlie and the wife of Percival Glyde might still exist for her sister, might still exist for me, but to all the world besides she was dead.
Some writers have objected to any extinct species or group of species being considered as intermediate between living species or groups.
This worried Uncle Henry a good deal, for without the farm he would have no way to earn a living. He was a good man, and worked in the field as hard as he could; and Aunt Em did all the housework, with Dorothy's help.
The living was hereafter for Edmund; and, had his uncle died a few years sooner, it would have been duly given to some friend to hold till he were old enough for orders.
Then he pulled out his grandmother's will, and read it over to me, whereby it appeared that she had left a small plantation, as he called it, on York River, that is, where my mother lived, to me, with the stock of servants and cattle upon it, and given it in trust to this son of mine for my use, whenever he should hear of my being alive, and to my heirs, if I had any children, and in default of heirs, to whomsoever I should by will dispose of it; but gave the income of it, till I should be heard of, or found, to my said son; and if I should not be living, then it was to him, and his heirs.