living

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living

1. (of animals or plants) existing in the present age; extant
2. presented by actors before a live audience
3. Church of England another term for benefice
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in classic literature ?
The living thing did I follow; I walked in the broadest and narrowest paths to learn its nature.
This remark no doubt must be restricted to those groups which have undergone much change in the course of geological ages; and it would be difficult to prove the truth of the proposition, for every now and then even a living animal, as the Lepidosiren, is discovered having affinities directed towards very distinct groups.
Evidently only with an effort did he understand anything living; but it was obvious that he failed to understand, not because he lacked the power to do so but because he understood something else- something the living did not and could not understand- and which wholly occupied his mind.
By all which acquirements, I should be a living treasure of knowledge and wisdom, and certainly become the oracle of the nation.
I did not even know, till I understood his design, that the living was vacant; nor had it ever occurred to me that he might have had such a living in his gift.
Alive, with the poor drawing-master to fight her battle, and to win the way back for her to her place in the world of living beings.
So he told his wife, Aunt Em, of his trouble, and she first cried a little and then said that they must be brave and do the best they could, and go away somewhere and try to earn an honest living. But they were getting old and feeble and she feared that they could not take care of Dorothy as well as they had formerly done.
"I know how you feel jest now--but if you keep on living you'll get glad again, and the first thing you know you'll be dreaming again--thank the good Lord for it!
She was less dazzling in reality, but, on the other hand, there was something fresh and seductive in the living woman which was not in the portrait.
But as there are many sorts of provision, so are the methods of living both of man and the brute creation very various; and as it is impossible to live without food, the difference in that particular makes the lives of animals so different from each other.
William Holt, a wealthy manufacturer of Chicago, was living temporarily in a little town of central New York, the name of which the writer's memory has not retained.
It struck me, from watching those with whom I associated, that the life we were living was more destructive than that lived by the average man.

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