LL

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LL

(communications)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

LL

On drawings, abbr. for live load.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

LL

(grammar)
A class of language grammars, which can be parsed without backtracking. The first L stands for Left-to-right scan, the second for Leftmost derivation.

Often found in the form LL(k) where k is the number of tokens of look-ahead required when parsing a sentence of the language. In particular, LL(1) is a fairly restrictive class of grammar, but allows simple top-down parsing (e.g. recursive-descent) to be used without wasteful backtracking. A number of programming languages are LL(1) (or close).
This article is provided by FOLDOC - Free Online Dictionary of Computing (foldoc.org)
References in classic literature ?
(ll. 156-169b) But when earth had covered this generation also, Zeus the son of Cronos made yet another, the fourth, upon the fruitful earth, which was nobler and more righteous, a god-like race of hero-men who are called demi-gods, the race before our own, throughout the boundless earth.
(ll. 169c-169d) And again far-seeing Zeus made yet another generation, the fifth, of men who are upon the bounteous earth.
(ll. 170-201) Thereafter, would that I were not among the men of the fifth generation, but either had died before or been born afterwards.
(ll. 202-211) And now I will tell a fable for princes who themselves understand.
(ll. 212-224) But you, Perses, listen to right and do not foster violence; for violence is bad for a poor man.
(ll. 225-237) But they who give straight judgements to strangers and to the men of the land, and go not aside from what is just, their city flourishes, and the people prosper in it: Peace, the nurse of children, is abroad in their land, and all-seeing Zeus never decrees cruel war against them.
(ll. 238-247) But for those who practise violence and cruel deeds far-seeing Zeus, the son of Cronos, ordains a punishment.
(ll. 248-264) You princes, mark well this punishment you also; for the deathless gods are near among men and mark all those who oppress their fellows with crooked judgements, and reck not the anger of the gods.
(ll. 265-266) He does mischief to himself who does mischief to another, and evil planned harms the plotter most.
(ll. 267-273) The eye of Zeus, seeing all and understanding all, beholds these things too, if so he will, and fails not to mark what sort of justice is this that the city keeps within it.
(ll. 274-285) But you, Perses, lay up these things within you heart and listen now to right, ceasing altogether to think of violence.
(ll. 286-292) To you, foolish Perses, I will speak good sense.