Lobby

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Related to lobbyism: lobbying

lobby

1. a room or corridor used as an entrance hall, vestibule, etc.
2. Chiefly Brit a hall in a legislative building used for meetings between the legislators and members of the public
3. Chiefly Brit one of two corridors in a legislative building in which members vote
4. a group of persons who attempt to influence legislators on behalf of a particular interest

Lobby

A space at the entrance to a building, theater, hotel, or other structure.

Lobby

 

auxiliary premises in parliamentary and other government buildings, as well as in theaters and concert halls, designed for rest during breaks between sessions or during intermissions. Lobbies are also used for unofficial meetings and exchange of opinions and often serve as work areas for journalists. The expression “lobbying” characterizes behind-the-scenes deals made in capitalist legislative institutions by representatives of the ruling circles who are close to members of the institutions or to high government officials.


Lobby

 

the system of offices and agencies of the major monopolies assigned to legislative bodies of the USA. Lobbies exert direct pressure on legislators and state officials even to the point of bribery for the sake of the companies involved.

lobby

A space at the entrance to a building, theater, etc.
References in periodicals archive ?
This leads to a discussion of forms of lobbyism and a focus on the politicians who leave politics through the so called 'revolving door' to work in the private sector.
Where unions, business firms and interest groups used to find themselves widely represented in government committees and other government bodies, today the same groups instead seek to achieve influence through, among other things, parliamentary lobbyism and media lobbyism (Johansson & Larsson 2015: 129).
The mediatisation of politics as well as the decline in corporatism has led to rise in lobbyism in Scandinavia according to the studies mentioned above.
2013 conclude that interest groups in both Denmark and Norway increasingly between the years 1982-2005 lobby both parliament and government in order to gain influence, whereas there is little change regarding the relatively low level of lobbyism aimed at civil servants: bureaucratic lobbyism.
Studies looking at the development of lobbyism in the different Scandinavian countries are nonetheless still few in number.
Other examples of Taneva's lobbyism include the amendments in the Hunting Act, the Farming Lands Ownership Act, the Uncultivated Lands Act, all serving the interests of land owners, according to the accusations.
Bulgaria's Transport Minister Alexander Tsvetkov denied accusations of lobbyism during Parliament's Friday sitting and explained that the requirement which has been abolished refers to the comfort of the buses and not to their safety.
Earlier Friday, Bulgaria's Transport Minister Alexander Tsvetkov, denied accusations of lobbyism explained that the amendment which was abolished refers to the comfort of the buses and not to their safety.