Lobby

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Related to lobbyism: lobbying

lobby

1. a room or corridor used as an entrance hall, vestibule, etc.
2. Chiefly Brit a hall in a legislative building used for meetings between the legislators and members of the public
3. Chiefly Brit one of two corridors in a legislative building in which members vote
4. a group of persons who attempt to influence legislators on behalf of a particular interest
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

Lobby

A space at the entrance to a building, theater, hotel, or other structure.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Lobby

 

auxiliary premises in parliamentary and other government buildings, as well as in theaters and concert halls, designed for rest during breaks between sessions or during intermissions. Lobbies are also used for unofficial meetings and exchange of opinions and often serve as work areas for journalists. The expression “lobbying” characterizes behind-the-scenes deals made in capitalist legislative institutions by representatives of the ruling circles who are close to members of the institutions or to high government officials.


Lobby

 

the system of offices and agencies of the major monopolies assigned to legislative bodies of the USA. Lobbies exert direct pressure on legislators and state officials even to the point of bribery for the sake of the companies involved.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

lobby

A space at the entrance to a building, theater, etc.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Thus, in this study we focus on the development of PR and lobbyism in Denmark to gain an understanding of whether, and how, this development may be different in Denmark than in Sweden and Norway, but also which similarities there may be found between Denmark, Norway and Sweden when compared to the US.
Especially industry representatives with a deep relation to lobbyism had a stronger focus on a contact with politicians and even refused to work with media.
A great part of current think tank research - or other contributions focusing lobbyism in general -- remain policy blind, as von Winter rightly emphasizes (von Winter 2004).
GERB further voiced suspicions of lobbyism as there is currently only one licensed gambling operator in the country.
Statens offentliga utredningar, 1999: Avkorporativisering och lobbyism, SOU 1999:121, Stockholm.
Bulgaria's far-right, nationalist Ataka party will topple the new Cabinet on the spot upon noticing any lobbyism or actions against the interests of the people, according to party leader, Volen Siderov.
A great part of current think tank research--or other contributions focusing lobbyism in general--remain policy blind, as von Winter rightly emphasizes (von Winter 2004).
For this reason, the topic of lobbyism is irrational because people who don't like something cannot lobby for it," the letter states.
The opposition from the left-wing Coalition for Bulgaria and the far-right, nationalist party Ataka, once again accused the ruling Citizens for European Development of Bulgaria, GERB, of lobbyism and passing unfeasible amendments.