lobola


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lobola

, lobolo
(in southern Africa) an African custom by which a bridegroom's family makes a payment in cattle or cash to the bride's family shortly before the marriage
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
If a man cannot afford lobola when the couple moves in together, payments may proceed over months or even years; in such cases, nonmarital partnerships may eventually make the transition to marriages.
Lobola is still practiced in South Africa today although problems surround the practice and changes are occurring.
seriously." (40) Because lobola is an explicitly gendered practice, parents do not
Schapera and Maharaj have given the customary-law practice of lobola ('bride price') substantial attention (15-16), as it underscores women's situation with regards to their bodily autonomy.
Feeling betrayed not only by her community but also by her own parents, whose concern is for the 13 head of cattle and the horse that they will receive as lobola for her, Nokulunga fiercely resists her young husband-to-be, Xolani, when he tries to take her by force.
At the same time, until he pays lobola (bride wealth), a biological father may not be recognised as a legitimate father of a child, especially by the family of the child's mother, and he may be restricted from visiting his child at the mother's family homestead (Makusha, Richter, & Bhana, 2012).
These include lobola (gifts of cattle as bride-price); muti as covering the multiple senses of the Homeric term pharmakon; inyanga (traditional healer or diviner, especially one specialising in herbalism) to render the Homeric ieter or ietros.
Riverflix, a startup founded by U.S.-based Kenyan entrepreneur Colo Shivere, has acquired roughly 1,500 titles from across the continent (including Kenyan hit "Me, My Wife and Her Guru" and Zimbabwean comedy "Lobola") since launching last year.
Masekela explained that before a marriage, the bride and groom's families enter into a long negotiation about the "lobola," or bride price.
(1.) That cattle still have significant symbolic currency in the modern state of 21st century South Africa is attested to by Nelson Mandela having paid lobola (loosely translated as pride price and valued as a number of head of cattle) for his bride, Graca Machel, widow of Samora Machel the ex-president of Mozambique.
Bridewealth, sometimes called bride price or lobola, is the payment from a husband's family to a wife's family in recognition of the couple's marriage.