local noon

local noon

[′lō·kəl ′nün]
(astronomy)
Noon at the local meridian.
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References in periodicals archive ?
In timekeeping, "Julian Days" don't start at midnight in Greenwich, England, but rather at local noon there.
It's really not when the day and the night are of equal length, although that's what we think of - it's really that moment is when the sun is on the equator at local noon," Matthew Holman, an astrophysicist at Harvard University, told National Geographic in 2015.
It appears that Twitter becomes the new battleground of the two Philippine local noon time shows.
This particular eclipse will be especially important as, for the first time, prior to the eclipse, LRO will be pass over the moon's surface at local noon time when it is nearly at its warmest.
However, magnetic recordings in the UK, USA and Australia all show a disturbance indicating that it was a global event and hence more likely to be associated with a CME rather than an SFE, which tend to be confined to regions close to local noon at the time of the flare.
Activities include painting competitions, quizzes, slogan writing, water rocketry, lectures, film shows on space travel and astronomy, Eratosthenes experiments, and finding local noon for students and the general public.
here [[phi].sub.LA]--latitude angle of location A, in deg., [[DELTA][phi].sub.M] = [[phi].sub.MN] - [[phi].sub.MA]--longitude difference angle between local noon [[phi].sub.MN] and location A [[phi].sub.MA], rad, [delta]--distance from the sun to equator (declination) angle, rad.
His geometrical method used the length of the shadow cast by a vertical rod at local noon during the summer solstice and his knowledge that the length of the shadow at a point further south was zero.
And it took the arrival of the railways, with their need for a consistent time across the country, to end the practice of each town calibrating its clocks to local noon.
Investigations of the histograms similarity revealed the palindrome effect, which is: two sets of histograms built on the base of two consecutive 12-hours time series are most similar if one set of the histograms is rearranged in inverse order, and the start time of the series is exact six hours later the local noon.
* Solar noon is when the sun is half way in time--between sunrise and sunset at your location and is therefore called local noon.

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