location analysis

location analysis

[lō′kā·shən ə‚nal·ə·səs]
(design engineering)
An initial step in the design of a robotic system consisting of a detailed study of all aspects of the placement of components such as work stations, buffers, and materials-handling equipment, as well as accessories, tools, and workpieces within a work station.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
(2009), "A Location Analysis Approach for Military Maintenance Scheduling," Omega, 37(4): 838-852.
We would also like to thank the Society for Location Analysis for their support of this project.
Also improved is weld-line calculation, gate location analysis, injection time prediction, runner-balance analysis, and 3D fiber orientation--which now accounts for orientation effects in the runner.
"The main objectives of the application are to access relevant data, supporting key location analysis business drivers including intelligent assessments of regional demographics, infrastructure, labor and political and economic risk."
For location analysis, an online mapping platform may be best to identify trends by channel, geography and time.
Geocoding is the process of converting addresses into geographic coordinates to allow location analysis. By combining geographic knowledge with business information, businesses can make smarter decisions that will lead to better products, as well as cost savings and process improvements.
TABLE 1: A summary of AE source location analysis. Cycle Load Visual observation no.
Del Boyette is president and CEO of Boyette Strategic Advisors, an economic development, public policy and location analysis firm based in Little Rock, with offices in Atlanta and Orlando.
The value of analytics to strengthen: As more businesses universally accept the use of analytics, the use of Natural Language Processing, information retrieval, semantics analysis and machine learning, GEO location analysis and speech recognition will further drive innovation in all industries.
Finally, organizations need a good understanding of the community's geographical landscape; being able to perform a location analysis is vital to preparation, response, and recovery.
We recommend the excellent paper by ReVelle and Eiselt [21] as an introduction to the location analysis. The authors distinguish two basic types of location problems: continuous location problems, which are for the most part planar problems and tend to be non-linear optimization problems, and discrete location problems, which are most often network problems, involve zeroone variables and result in integer programming optimization problems.