locomotive boiler


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locomotive boiler

[‚lō·kə′mōd·iv ¦bȯil·ər]
(mechanical engineering)
An internally fixed horizontal fire-tube boiler with integral furnace; the doubled furnace walls contain water which mixes with water in the boiler shell.
References in periodicals archive ?
This is where we begin to see the need for steam locomotive boiler construction rules.
It had become such that it was quite possible, if not probable, that a perfectly reputable "normal" boiler shop could legitimately build an unsatisfactory steam locomotive boiler in accordance with the Code and with all good intentions.
At the request of the locomotive boiler industry, BPV I formed the Subgroup on Locomotive Boilers on February 10,2010.
Steam locomotive boilers have not been built in the United States since 1952.
It was felt by all that any steam locomotive boilers could be built in accordance with the current Section I, Rules for Construction of Power Boilers, and that is where matters have stood until 2015.
One of the curious things about locomotive boilers is that they work at all, especially the bigger ones.
Some may wonder why a modern code would address locomotive boiler technology, which could be considered an arcane art.
Over time it had become quite possible--if not probable--that a perfectly reputable boiler shop could have the best of intentions and still legitimately build an unsatisfactory steam locomotive boiler in accordance with the Boiler Code.
This new edition of Section I marks the first time in more than 60 years that ASME has published a stand-alone code addressing requirements for locomotive boilers.
Millions of people throughout the world ride behind and stand near steam locomotive boilers every year.
In an attempt to rectify this situation, the ASME Subgroup on Locomotive Boilers has taken the approach of codifying both best practices and Code material from the early steam days of the locomotive, melding modern technology into the process where that technology has been tested and proven.
The nuclear Code, Williams wrote, took the name Section III, because that had once designated a section of the Code for locomotive boilers, and as he put it, that section "had become defunct.