locoweed


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Related to locoweed: purple locoweed

locoweed

or

crazyweed

[Span. loco=crazy], any of several American species of the genera Astragalus and Oxytropus, north-temperate leguminous plants of the family Leguminosae (pulsepulse,
in botany, common name for members of the Fabaceae (Leguminosae), a large plant family, called also the pea, or legume, family. Numbering about 650 genera and 17,000 species, the family is third largest, after the asters and the orchids.
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 family), that, when eaten by horses, cattle, or sheep, cause a nervous disorder called loco disease. The locoweeds, perennials native to the West and Southwest, have pealike flowers and pinnately compound leaves. Not all species of these genera have been found poisonous. An Old World plant related to the Astragalus locoweeds is the source of gum tragacanthtragacanth
or gum tragacanth,
gummy exudation from the leguminous shrub Astragalus gummifer and related pulse family plants of SE Europe and W Asia. It is obtained through incisions in the stem of the plant. The gum is produced chiefly in Iran.
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. Locoweed is classified in the division MagnoliophytaMagnoliophyta
, division of the plant kingdom consisting of those organisms commonly called the flowering plants, or angiosperms. The angiosperms have leaves, stems, and roots, and vascular, or conducting, tissue (xylem and phloem).
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, class Magnoliopsida, order Rosales, family Leguminosae.
References in periodicals archive ?
Effect of previous locoweed (Astragalus and Oxytropis species) intoxication on conditioned taste aversions in horses and sheep.
Locoweed poisoning in a northern New Mexico elk herd.
We focused on six native species that were abundant and had floral morphologies (flower shapes) that varied from legumes with hidden nectaries and anthers (purple locoweed [Oxytropis lambertii] and American vetch [Vicia americana]), to species with dish-shaped flowers and obvious pollen and nectar (prairie flax [Linum lewisii], yellow sundrops [Calylophus serrulatus], and scarlet globemallow [Sphaeralcea coccinea]), to the bell-shaped flowers of blue bellflower (Campanula rotundifolia).
Also called purple locoweed, Texas loco, woolly crazyweed.
James at the ARS Poisonous Plants Laboratory in Logan, Utah, pinpointed swainsonine as the culprit in locoweed poisonings about 10 years ago.
On inland dunes, open swaths of sand provide habitat for sunloving annual plants and low-growing desert wildflowers such as white evening primrose, pink sand verbena, and violet locoweed.
It was used to study glucoprotein N-link oligosaccharide as an instrument drug, since it was separated initially from the fruit of Australian Swainsona canescens and North America locoweed (including Astragalus and Oxytropis spp.
This means that there is apparently no harm to neighboring plants for the locoweed syndrome.
Evelyn Healy arrives at work in jeans and hiking boots and begins sorting through her work: Southern California locoweed, hummingbird sage, yarrow and wooly blue curls, all native to the Santa Monica Mountains.
Larkspur, like pine needles, locoweed, lupine, and a host of other plants found in western pastures, contains toxins that can poison unwitting, hungry livestock.
Milkweed, wild cherry, locoweed, and others should be avoided.
More than 100 species of locoweed grow in New Mexico.