locoweed


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Related to locoweed: purple locoweed

locoweed

or

crazyweed

[Span. loco=crazy], any of several American species of the genera Astragalus and Oxytropus, north-temperate leguminous plants of the family Leguminosae (pulsepulse,
in botany, common name for members of the Fabaceae (Leguminosae), a large plant family, called also the pea, or legume, family. Numbering about 650 genera and 17,000 species, the family is third largest, after the asters and the orchids.
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 family), that, when eaten by horses, cattle, or sheep, cause a nervous disorder called loco disease. The locoweeds, perennials native to the West and Southwest, have pealike flowers and pinnately compound leaves. Not all species of these genera have been found poisonous. An Old World plant related to the Astragalus locoweeds is the source of gum tragacanthtragacanth
or gum tragacanth,
gummy exudation from the leguminous shrub Astragalus gummifer and related pulse family plants of SE Europe and W Asia. It is obtained through incisions in the stem of the plant. The gum is produced chiefly in Iran.
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. Locoweed is classified in the division MagnoliophytaMagnoliophyta
, division of the plant kingdom consisting of those organisms commonly called the flowering plants, or angiosperms. The angiosperms have leaves, stems, and roots, and vascular, or conducting, tissue (xylem and phloem).
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, class Magnoliopsida, order Rosales, family Leguminosae.
References in periodicals archive ?
The toxicology mechanism of endophytic fungus and swainsonine in locoweed. Enviromental Toxicology and Pharmacology, v.47, p.38-46, 2016.
The lesions of locoweed (Astragalus mollissimus), swainsonine, and castanospermine in rats.
The second challenge is that even though many of the foods that elicit emesis, nausea, or generalized malaise also condition a feeding aversion (Parker, 2006), there are many exceptions (e.g., larkspur, locoweed, and PA-containing plants).
Still, some easy-to-see flowers include skyrocket gilia, alpine lupines (notice their fuzziness), lewisias, penstemons, draba, silene, locoweed, pussypaws, phlox (P.
It has been used as an instrument drug to study glucoprotein N-link oligosaccharide since its initial extraction from the fruit of Australian Swainsona canescens and North America locoweed (including Astragalus and Oxytropis spp.) (Dantas et al.
locoweed: Any of several leguminous plants of western North America causing locoism in livestock.
We focused on six native species that were abundant and had floral morphologies (flower shapes) that varied from legumes with hidden nectaries and anthers (purple locoweed [Oxytropis lambertii] and American vetch [Vicia americana]), to species with dish-shaped flowers and obvious pollen and nectar (prairie flax [Linum lewisii], yellow sundrops [Calylophus serrulatus], and scarlet globemallow [Sphaeralcea coccinea]), to the bell-shaped flowers of blue bellflower (Campanula rotundifolia).
Locoweed, poisonous to livestock, contains a component that destroys malignancies.
On inland dunes, open swaths of sand provide habitat for sunloving annual plants and low-growing desert wildflowers such as white evening primrose, pink sand verbena, and violet locoweed. In the troughs between the dunes (interdune areas), you'll find scurf-pea and "blowout" or bunchgrasses, and at dune edges, taller shrubby plants like creosote bush, four-winged saltbush, honey mesquite.