log rule

log rule

[′läg ¦rül]
(forestry)
A table showing expected log output in board feet or other units.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Sawtimber volumes are based on the girard form class volume tables utilizing the international 1/4 inch log rule. Sawtimber volumes for blocks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9 were 100% tallied.
* Using the Doyle Log Rule Table, this would yield an estimated 138.5 board feet per tree, or a 106.7 percent increase in volume.
However, the Doyle log rule was created in 1825 and the Scribner rule in 1846.
Based on personal interviews with logging contractors in the region, those rates can range from as low as $110/MBF to $180/MBF (depending on log rule) for sawtimber or $12 to $22 per ton in the case of pulpwood/ chipwood.
Traditionally, sawmill inventories have been measured in units of board feet, cubic feet, or cubic meter volumes using conventional log scaling procedures such as the Doyle log rule, International 1/4 inch rule, or Scribner log rule.
The mill surveys provided statewide data on the volume of timber received by sawmills in 1,000 board feet (MBF) Scribner log rule, log size, total lumber production, mill residue volume, and disposition of residue.
Currently, three major log scaling rules are used in the eastern United States: Doyle log rule, Scribner rule, and International 'A-inch rule (Cassens 2001).
Two major factors in the western United States appear to have largely influenced BF/CF ratios: changes in log diameter processed by western sawmills and the use of Westside versus Eastside variants of the Scribner Log Rule.
Because sawmills in the western United States use the Scribner Log Rule (SLR) as the unit of log input, higher LO is not a clear indication that mills are using improved sawing technology and techniques.
As is common in the hardwood industry, taper was calculated based on the International 1/4 inch Log Rule and Grosenbaugh's rules which both assume 1/2 inch of taper per 4 feet of log length (Grosenbaugh 1952).
Rather than concentrating on log grades, Schumacher and Young (1943) were studying the relationship between empirical log rules among species and lumber grades.
He begins by setting out basics, such as units of measurement and conversions, forest biomass sampling, and timber scaling and log rules. Then he samples specific aspects, among them forest-based biomass conversion/power generation technologies, and the environmental impact of forest biomass removal.