logarithmic scale


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logarithmic scale

[′läg·ə‚rith·mik ′skāl]
(mathematics)
A scale in which the distances that numbers are at from a reference point are proportional to their logarithms.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is seen that part of the spectrum in the range of 15-50 [cm.sup.-1] is linear in a logarithmic scale; hence the dependence of the density of states on frequency is described by a power function g(v) ~ [v.sup.[alpha]].
Absolute errors (in logarithmic scale) of approximations, for Example 1 with n =1, m=10 iterations and N = 10, 25, 50,100.
In the first edition of the Trends book, the logarithmic scale was still used but a separate version of the trends with Cartesian coordinates was also provided.
The drawback of SNR observables is that they are reported in logarithmic scale (in dB), their resolution is in some cases limited as they are rounded to 1 dB, and the value of SNR is receiver depended, according to the applied code correlation technique (Hoffmenn-Wellenhof et al., 2001).
In Figure 4, we plot the error as functions of m, where a logarithmic scale is used for the spatial-error-axis.
pH, on the other hand, is a calculation of the concentration of free (positive) protons measured on a negative logarithmic scale and then expressed as a positive number.
For convenience, a semi logarithmic scale has been used.
Since it is a logarithmic scale, you can't simply add up the total dBs incoming, and get a total.
The seismograph gauge is based on 10 logarithmic scale, which means the difference in energy between three and four is tenfold; likewise, seven is 1,000 times higher than four on the RMS.
The BI was calculated according to Ridley's logarithmic scale from 0 to 6 +.