logging


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logging

the work of felling, trimming, and transporting timber

Logging

 

the process of procuring timber, including the main and auxiliary operations of felling trees, hauling them from the felling sites, and partly processing them at lower woodyards. Felling requires approximately 25–30 percent of the total amount of labor involved in logging, transport (hauling the trees to woodyards) 5–10 percent, storage 15–20 percent, and other operations 40–45 percent.

The Russian word for logging, lesozagotovka, means literally timber (leso) procurement (zagotovka). The word is derived from the practice in prerevolutionary Russia of manually procuring lumber, in the form of logs (graded timber), at felling sites, mainly in winter. The logs were piled up along riverbanks and floated in spring and summer. In the USSR all the production processes in logging and timber procurement establishments are mechanized.

The USSR leads the world in the amount of logs hauled (1972). The logging and timber procurement establishments are steadily increasing the delivery to the economy of commercial timber and lumber in ever more finished form.

Commercial timber constituted 42 percent of all logging in 1923–24 and 73 per cent in 1951, and it was expected to constitute 87 percent in 1975.

D. K. VOEVODA and V. I. ALIAB’EV

logging

[′läg·iŋ]
(engineering)
Continuous recording versus depth of some characteristic datum of the formations penetrated by a drill hole; for example, resistivity, spontaneous potential, conductivity, fluid content, radioactivity, or density.
(forestry)
The cutting and removal of the woody stem portions of forest trees.
References in periodicals archive ?
These steps opened the eyes of the Papua New Guinea authorities to the methods of the logging companies, and they set up an inquiry, which roused the resentment of other logging companies.
In logging, as in all natural resource industries, the cost of raw materials is critical, and the success of underwater wood will probably depend on economics, says Eugene Wengert, a forest products industry consultant and retired professor of forest ecology and management from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.
Satellite surveys have difficulty picking out effects of logging and fires because they remain obvious only for a year, then new growth obscures the damage, says Nepstad.
Dean complains that no level of logging would be acceptable to activists, and that's true for some groups that want to see California's remaining redwoods protected.
Without trees from national forests, these mills and the communities that depend on them may have trouble - a hardship magnified by the fact that 25 percent of the Forest Service's gross timber-sale revenues goes to local counties, which can become dependent on national forest logging to pay for essential services.
Without such training the Brunswick House company would have encountered difficulties in meeting requirements such as WHMIS certification and logging guidelines, Neshawabin says.
Injured trees diminish the wood's future value, and erosion from logging roads and skid trails contributes heavily to sedimentation of rural streams.
Most environmentalists saw the logging rider as the single worst environmental law passed in the 104th Congress, and Clinton is on record as regretting his advocacy of it.
A rule of thumb, says Bristol, is that logging creates a mere four and a half U.
Those in the agency who "produce," by efficiently preparing timber-sale areas for logging, advance within the system.