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Axis,

coalition of countries headed by Germany, Italy, and Japan, 1936–45 (see World War IIWorld War II,
1939–45, worldwide conflict involving every major power in the world. The two sides were generally known as the Allies and the Axis. Causes and Outbreak
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). The expression "Rome-Berlin axis" originated in Oct., 1936, with an accord reached by HitlerHitler, Adolf
, 1889–1945, founder and leader of National Socialism (Nazism), and German dictator, b. Braunau in Upper Austria. Early Life

The son of Alois Hitler (1837–1903), an Austrian customs official, Adolf Hitler dropped out of high school, and
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 and MussoliniMussolini, Benito
, 1883–1945, Italian dictator and leader of the Fascist movement. Early Career

His father, an ardent Socialist, was a blacksmith; his mother was a teacher.
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. The Axis was solidified by an Italo-German alliance in May, 1939. This was extended (Sept., 1940) by a military alliance among Germany, Italy, and Japan—the so-called Berlin Pact, to which Hungary, Romania, Bulgaria, Slovakia, and Croatia adhered later. The related Anti-Comintern Pact (see CominternComintern
[acronym for Communist International], name given to the Third International, founded at Moscow in 1919. Vladimir Ilyich Lenin feared a resurgence of the Second, or Socialist, International under non-Communist leadership.
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), originally concluded between Germany and Japan in 1936, later had as adherents, besides the Berlin Pact nations, Spain, Denmark, Finland, and the puppet governments of Manchukuo and Nanjing.
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/

axis

1. An imaginary line that usually passes through the center of a body or system and about which the body is often symmetrical or has some form of symmetry. It is the imaginary line about which a rotating body turns or about which an object, such as the celestial sphere, appears to rotate.
2. A reference line on a graph.
Collins Dictionary of Astronomy © Market House Books Ltd, 2006

Axis

An imaginary straight line, about which parts of a building, or group of buildings, can be arranged or measured.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved

axis

[′ak·səs]
(anatomy)
The second cervical vertebra in higher vertebrates; the first vertebra of amphibians.
The center line of an organism, organ, or other body part.
(geology)
A line where a folded bed has maximum curvature.
The central portion of a mountain chain.
(graphic arts)
The locus of intersection of two pencils of lines in perspective position.
(mathematics)
In a coordinate system, the line determining one of the coordinates, obtained by setting all other coordinates to zero.
A line of symmetry for a geometric figure.
For a cone whose base has a center, a line passing through this center and the vertex of the cone.
(mechanics)
A line about which a body rotates.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

axis

A straight line indicating center of symmetry of a solid or plane figure.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Axis

in World War II, the affiance of Germany, Italy, Japan, etc., opposing the Allies. [Eur. Hist.: Collier’s, VIII, 457]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

axis

1
1. a real or imaginary line about which a body, such as an aircraft, can rotate or about which an object, form, composition, or geometrical construction is symmetrical
2. one of two or three reference lines used in coordinate geometry to locate a point in a plane or in space
3. Anatomy the second cervical vertebra
4. Botany the main central part of a plant, typically consisting of the stem and root, from which secondary branches and other parts develop
5. an alliance between a number of states to coordinate their foreign policy
6. Optics the line of symmetry of an optical system, such as the line passing through the centre of a lens
7. Geology an imaginary line along the crest of an anticline or the trough of a syncline
8. Crystallog one of three lines passing through the centre of a crystal and used to characterize its symmetry

axis

2
any of several S Asian deer of the genus Axis, esp A. axis. They typically have a reddish-brown white-spotted coat and slender antlers
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Although an accentuated variability in the long axis angulations of the dental crowns measured in plaster models occurred in this study, a specific coronary positioning pattern can be observed for mandibular canines, mainly in Angle Class III malocclusions.
When passive end-feel is achieved, the examiner drops an imaginary plumb line perpendicular to the long axis of the tibia from the fifth MTP joint to the plantar-most spot on the heel and takes a reading by visualizing the distance between that spot on the heel and the "plumb line" (Fig.
SEM micrographs taken of the fracture surfaces of the 35 wt% coated fiberglass samples reveal a high level of fiber orientation on the long axis of the samples with large cross sections.
According to Alexander, such vortices can be generated in two ways: by rotation of the wing about its long axis as it is tilted at the start of each stroke, and by translation of the wing during the stroke.
pallets, which hold two drums each, in two rows of storage along the long axis of a 2,000 sq ft, stand-alone receiving warehouse.
The test specimen, must be broken so the fracture is straight and through the long axis of the wedge, making it possible to "read" the white-to-dark gray shades in the fracture.
(Although this greenhouse works well stuated with the long axis running east-west--"We didn't have any choice!"--ideally, the long side should be oriented north-south or nearly so.)
Various positions of MF with the reference to the long axis of premolars (position 1-4) have been described.
I described it as "Enormous, bright, narrowly elliptical; brightening gradually to the centre and extending to about 25' in its long axis." I couldn't see any internal structure.
The paper details how electricity is generated using FFNG - an electric double layer is created around the fiber, and the flowing solution composed either of a saline solution or water, which then distorts the charge distribution in the blood vessel and generates electricity along a long axis.