long ears

long ears

symbol of licentiousness. [Indian Myth.: Leach, 333]
See: Lust
References in classic literature ?
Yes, my white father, I have long ears, though they say that I grow deaf.
Now then," said his Majesty, waving his long ears gently to and fro, "tell me why you are here, and what you expect me to do for you.
Virgil, I think, tells us, that when the mob are assembled in a riotous and tumultuous manner, and all sorts of missile weapons fly about, if a man of gravity and authority appears amongst them, the tumult is presently appeased, and the mob, which when collected into one body, may be well compared to an ass, erect their long ears at the grave man's discourse.
cried Pinocchio, grasping his two long ears in his hands and pulling and tugging at them angrily, just as if they belonged to another.
What was the amazement--nor to say the horror of the whole assembly, when Sylvie actually patted His Majesty on the head, while Bruno seized his long ears and pretended to tie them together under his chin!
Four legs began to grow on him, a thick head, and two long ears, and he saw with horror that he had changed into a donkey.
The next scene was a puzzler, for in came another animal, on all-fours this time, with a new sort of tail and long ears.
Some days afterwards there was an auction at the old house, and the little boy saw from his window how they carried the old knights and the old ladies away, the flower-pots with the long ears, the old chairs, and the old clothes-presses.
Dora made him lie down by her, with a good deal of persuasion; and when he was quiet, drew one of his long ears through and through her hand, repeating thoughtfully, 'Even little Jip
But afterwards, as springtime waxed, it was soon to be waving with long ears of corn, and its rich furrows to be loaded with grain upon the ground, while others would already be bound in sheaves.
that I am a talker, then the true reasoning runs that since all men of sense should avoid me, and thou hast not avoided me, but art at the present moment eating herrings with me under a holly-bush, ergo you are no man of sense, which is exactly what I have been dinning into your long ears ever since I first clapped eyes on your sunken chops.
Now I don't want any wiseacres to read this book, but if they should, of course they will prick up their long ears, and howl, or rather bray, at the above story.