long file names

long file names

File names that exceed the common eight plus three (8.3) character limitation used in DOS and Windows 3.1. Long file names are supported in Unix, Mac and Windows starting with Windows 95.

For compatibility with the 8.3 DOS format, Windows automatically converts long file and folder names into short names and maintains both forms. It creates pseudo short names with a suffix made up of the tilde character (~) and a numeric digit. Names that start with the same letters are differentiated by incrementing the digit at the end as in the following examples. See name mangling.
Long file name          Short file name

 manuscriptA.doc         manusc~1.doc
 manuscriptB.doc         manusc~2.doc
 manuscript C.doc        manusc~3.doc
 manuscripts D & E.doc   manusc~4.doc


 Long folder name        Short folder name

 Program Files           progra~1
References in periodicals archive ?
In text mode, the file menu is a familiar Windows-like interface with a virtual keyboard that accepts long file names so the user isn't limited by 8.3 specifications when naming their images.
New administrative capabilities include volume snapshot, support for long file names, full compatibility with Novell edirectory (formerly Novell Directory Services) and support for large volumes of up to eight terabytes.
The ads would list some aspect of Windows 95 -- long file names, say -- then point out that the very same feature was 'Macintosh '89.'
CheckCite 2000 is compatible with Windows 95 and 98, enabling it to support long file names and take advantage of the newest word-processing software.
(By the way, periods are allowed in Windows 95 long file names. "BASE0998.RUN" was the file name and ".TXT" was the extension in the above name.)
NT allows long file names, so try to be descriptive.
Long file names are available for directory names, too.
Users of the Intel-based PCs will enjoy working with folder icons that represent real disk hierarchies, an ever-present menu for software, a list of frequently-used files, long file names, and a help system that can act out its answers.
Will Win95's improved user interface, long file names, better performance, plug-and-play, and easier networking improve productivity?
When I open a new file for editing, I use the mouse to click on its name in a menu, which helps me to avoid having to remember the exact spelling of the name and encourages me to use long file names that can be more descriptive and thus easier to understand.
Again, the official line is that IBM and Microsoft henceforth will devote "the majority of their application and systems development resources" to OS/2 and, "beginning in the second half of 1990, plan to make their graphical applications available first on OS/2." According to the IBM's press release, moreover, "Microsoft stated that Windows is not intended to be used as a server, nor will future releases contain advanced OS/2 features such as distributed processing, the 32-bit flat memory model, threads, or long file names."