long-day plant


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long-day plant

[′lȯŋ ¦dā ‚plant]
(botany)
A plant that flowers in response to a long photoperiod.
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(1993) compared a long-day plant, Sinapis alba, with a short-day plant, Xanthium strumarium, and suggested the existence of a shoot-to-root signal which is under photoperiodic control and affects cytokinin synthesis in and/or release from the roots.
Promotion and inhibition of flower formation in a dayneutral plant in grafts with a short-day plant and a long-day plant. Proc.
In the long-day plant Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh., regarded as a model plant to study the genome structure of dicots, a number of genetic and physiological studies on flowering time have been made utilizing a large number of flowering-time and flower-formation mutants induced from various ecotypes.
Some crops are short-day plants, typically those grown in spring and fall, and some crops are long-day plants, which require more than 12 hours of light to flower.
Most summer flowering plants are long-day plants, requiring 14 hours or more of day length.
These are either short-day or long-day plants (Figure 7-9).
Long-day plants flower in the summer, short-day plants flower in early spring or fall, and day-neutral plants will flower under a variety of light conditions.