long-distance navigation

long-distance navigation

[′lȯŋ ‚dis·təns ‚nav·ə′gā·shən]
(navigation)
Navigation performed in an area where aids to navigation are spaced more than 200 miles (322 kilometers) apart, exclusive of the short-range, the approach and landing zone, and the airport zone.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is a finely built boat designed for long-distance navigation made without the use of blueprints and was taught to be made from one generation to another using an ancient technique that has been preserved and is still employed by boat makers of Sibutu island.
Among the topics are DNA damage and repair in vascular disease, the neural basis of long-distance navigation in birds, cortico-basal ganglia circuit function in psychiatric disease, and vascular growth factors and glomerular disease.
Since long-distance navigation and landmarks played so critical a role in this mission, a map or two may have helped the reader visualize its scope and scale.
He added: "For long-distance navigation and doing a journey the first time, they will use their in-built compasses and take sun and star bearings.
''For long-distance navigation and birds doing a journey for the first time, they will use the in-built compasses and take sun and star bearings.
Long-distance navigation encompasses a wide range of animal movements, from the circumglobal migrations of the arctic tern to the return flights to the nest of homing pigeons, covering tens to hundreds of kilometers (Able, 1996).